5.3/10
606
3 user 1 critic

Glenroy Brothers (Comic Boxing) (1894)

The Glenroy Brothers perform a portion of their vaudeville act, "The Comic View of Boxing: The Tramp & the Athlete", which depicts a boxer with a classic style trying to contend with an opponent who uses a very unorthodox approach.
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

Customer gets a lightning-fast shave.

Directors: William K.L. Dickson, William Heise
Sandow, No. 1 (1894)
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

Eugen Sandow, who claims to be the strongest man in the world, appears in the Edison Company's film studio.

Director: William K.L. Dickson
Stars: Eugen Sandow
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Annabelle (Whitford) Moore performs one of her popular dance routines. She uses her dance steps and her long, flowing skirts to create a variety of visual patterns.

Directors: William K.L. Dickson, William Heise
Stars: Annabelle Moore
Annie Oakley (1894)
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

The 'Little Sure Shot' of the 'Wild West.' Exhibition of Rifle Shooting at Glass Balls, etc. (from the Edison Catalog)

Director: William K.L. Dickson
Stars: Annie Oakley
Baby's Dinner (1895)
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

A baby is seated at a table between its cheerful parents, Auguste and Marguerite Lumière. While the father is feeding the baby with a spoon, the mother is pouring coffee into her cup. The ... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Stars: Auguste Lumière, Mrs. Auguste Lumiere, Andrée Lumière
Comedy | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A gardener is watering his flowers, when a mischievous boy sneaks up behind his back, and puts a foot on the water hose. The gardener is surprised, and looks into the nozzle to find out why... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Stars: François Clerc, Benoît Duval
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A man opens the big gates to the Lumière factory. Through the gateway and a smaller doorway beside it, workers are streaming out, turning either left or right. Most of them are women in ... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Short | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

In commedia dell'arte style, an actor on a stool presents six distinct characters through speedy application of whiskers and a hat or, in one case, a wig followed by a few gestures. First ... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

"King of the slack wire. His daring feats of balancing as he performs his thrilling feats in midair show that he is perfectly at home." (from Edison Films)

Director: William K.L. Dickson
Stars: Juan A. Caicedo
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Annabelle (Whitford) Moore performs one of her popular dances. For this performance, her costume has a pair of wings attached to her back, to suggest a butterfly. As she dances, she uses her long, flowing skirts to create visual patterns.

Director: William K.L. Dickson
Stars: Annabelle Moore
Short | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

James J. Corbett and Peter Courtney meet in a boxing exhibition.

Directors: William K.L. Dickson, William Heise
Stars: James J. Corbett, Peter Courtney
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

A group of Sioux Indians from Buffalo Bill's Wild West exhibition demonstrates a dance called a "ghost dance".

Directors: William K.L. Dickson, William Heise
Edit

Storyline

The Glenroy Brothers perform a portion of their vaudeville act, "The Comic View of Boxing: The Tramp & the Athlete", which depicts a boxer with a classic style trying to contend with an opponent who uses a very unorthodox approach.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Also Known As:

Glenroy fivérek  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Edited into Landmarks of Early Film (1997) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Intriguing staging in this early short
21 March 2005 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This 25-second long Edison Company kinetoscope short features vaudeville performers "The Glenroy Brothers" performing their "comic boxing" in a ring. There is a referee attending and frequently breaking up the action, and there are five people sitting in the ring, along the "back" rope. In some accounts, these five spectators are Edison Company employees. Note that this is often referred to as "The Glenroy Brothers (No. 2)", so there appears to be some confusion over which short is No.1 and which is No. 2.

I haven't been able to locate much information on The Glenroy Brothers, but for me, the most interesting thing about this short is the staging. The contrast of the constant motion of the boxers and referee against the almost immobile spectators flanked by two chairs is enthralling aesthetically. This staging isn't just an accident, because it's unusual for there to be spectators in the ring.

It has all the effect of a George Bellows boxing painting, such as Stag at Sharkey's, come to life. Bellows would have been about 12 when The Glenroy Brothers would have been showing on the kinetoscope in New York City, and he's unlikely to have seen it then, but Bellows did come to New York City in the early 1900s to study. Stag at Sharkey's was painted in 1909.

Being this far removed in time from The Glenroy Brothers, it's difficult to say what exactly makes this boxing "comic", but the fighting style is certainly humorous now. It consists primarily of each combatant swaying towards his opponent with both hands held high, only to basically bounce off of the same motion. They're mostly aiming for the head, and a couple good jabs are scored, one resulting in a brief knockdown. That the spectators are so statuesque makes this more comic, and a large part of the intriguing aesthetic effect is that the staging looks almost surreal in retrospect.

It's also interesting to note the camera motion, which seems to indicate that this was shot with hand-held camera, but I think that may be historically impossible. The kinetoscope cameras, which were the only ones extant at the time, were supposed to be very big and heavy.

At any rate, this is a fabulous short that is far ahead of its time. It's too bad the technology didn't exist for longer reels, as this one deserves it.


6 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page