7.3/10
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16 user 6 critic

Boycott (2001)

Black Americans boycott the public buses during the 1950s civil rights movement.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (teleplay) (as Herman Daniel Farrell III) | 1 more credit »
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5 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Iris Little Thomas ...
Rosa Parks (as Iris Little-Thomas)
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Bayard Rustin (as Erik Todd Dellums)
Mike Hodge ...
Whitman Mayo ...
Walter Franks ...
Mert Hatfield ...
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Danny Nelson ...
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Storyline

Black Americans boycott the public buses during the 1950s civil rights movement.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Start walkin'. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic material and some language | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 February 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Daybreak of Freedom  »

Filming Locations:

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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Carmen Ejogo, who plays Coretta Scott King in Boycott, went on to reprise the role thirteen years later in Selma (2014). See more »

Goofs

At 1:23 into the film, the Bayard Rustin character leaves his hotel and is walking down the street where he passes an establishment titled Posley Electric Appliances TV, Stereo, Radio. This takes place in December 1955, about 3 years before stereo sets were released to the public. See more »

Soundtracks

Home Sweet Alabama
Written by Ronnie Van Zant, Edward King & Gary Rossington
Arranged and Produced by Stephen James Taylor
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User Reviews

 
Excellent!
5 March 2001 | by (Orange County, CA USA) – See all my reviews

"Boycott" tells the story of a pivotal time in the history of a young republic still bleeding from civil war. The famous mid-50's bus boycott of Montgomery which launched the modern American civil rights movement is presented with restraint and an obvious commitment to truth over drama. The film is a well crafted integration of story, real and fabricated file footage, quick vignettes of blacks and whites expressing sentiments of the time, and an interesting wandering between color and black and white all serving to keep the sense of history alive and to prevent the viewer from becoming inured to the magnitude of the issues being presented. Kudos to Wright for an excellent portrayal of a great American leader. A good, entertaining history lesson for all.


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