7.3/10
674
16 user 6 critic

Boycott (2001)

Black Americans boycott the public buses during the 1950s civil rights movement.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (teleplay) (as Herman Daniel Farrell III) | 1 more credit »
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5 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Iris Little Thomas ...
Rosa Parks (as Iris Little-Thomas)
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Bayard Rustin (as Erik Todd Dellums)
Mike Hodge ...
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Walter Franks ...
Mert Hatfield ...
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Danny Nelson ...
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Storyline

Black Americans boycott the public buses during the 1950s civil rights movement.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Start walkin'. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic material and some language | See all certifications »
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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

24 February 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Daybreak of Freedom  »

Filming Locations:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Carmen Ejogo and Jeffrey Wright, who play married couple Coretta Scott King and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in this film, met on the set of Boycott and were married in 2000. They had two children and divorced in 2014. See more »

Goofs

At 1:23 into the film, the Bayard Rustin character leaves his hotel and is walking down the street where he passes an establishment titled Posley Electric Appliances TV, Stereo, Radio. This takes place in December 1955, about 3 years before stereo sets were released to the public. See more »

Soundtracks

King
Produced by Sanchez G. Harley
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User Reviews

 
Powerful film, moving experience
25 February 2001 | by (Philadelphia, PA) – See all my reviews

This film, following other classics of histo-drama such as Malcolm X or Cry Freedom, is not a biography of Martin Luther King. Instead, it shows in detail the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the beginnings of Dr. King's philosophy and motivation.

It is somewhat dis-orienting at first, as it is shot both in a documentary style, with references to the camera and a raw, un-cut feel, and in a more traditional style. However, as the movie progresses, you find both styles equally powerful in their methods.'

I found this film particularly moving because I was not alive during the events depicted, and the personification or the real-ization of the characters, people I grew up near worshiping, brought home just how different today's world is from 1950's Alabama.


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