7.5/10
24,347
250 user 76 critic

Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002)

In 1931, three aboriginal girls escape after being plucked from their homes to be trained as domestic staff and set off on a journey across the Outback.

Director:

Writers:

(book) (as Doris Pilkington Garimara), (screenplay)

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From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 23 wins & 24 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Laura Monaghan ...
Gracie Fields
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Ningali Lawford ...
Maud - Molly's Mother
Myarn Lawford ...
Molly's Grandmother
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Mavis
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Constable Riggs
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Natasha Wanganeen ...
Nina, Dormitory Boss
Garry McDonald ...
Mr. Neal at Moore River
...
Police Inspector
Lorna Lesley ...
Miss Thomas (as Lorna Leslie)
Celine O'Leary ...
Miss Jessop
Kate Roberts ...
Matron at Moore River

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Storyline

Western Australia, 1931. Government policy includes taking half-caste children from their Aboriginal mothers and sending them a thousand miles away to what amounts to indentured servitude, "to save them from themselves." Molly, Daisy, and Grace (two sisters and a cousin who are 14, 10, and 8) arrive at their Gulag and promptly escape, under Molly's lead. For days they walk north, following a fence that keeps rabbits from settlements, eluding a native tracker and the regional constabulary. Their pursuers take orders from the government's "chief protector of Aborigines," A.O. Neville, blinded by Anglo-Christian certainty, evolutionary world view and conventional wisdom. Can the girls survive? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

If the government tore you away from your family, would you walk the 1500 miles back home? See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for emotional thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

31 January 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Long Walk Home  »

Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£221,758 (UK) (8 November 2002)

Gross:

$6,165,429 (USA) (25 April 2003)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The last scene in the movie, which shows the real-life Molly Craig walking with a walking stick, was shot first. According to Phillip Noyce, during an interview after a screening, Molly's age and health made it so that it would be best if that scene was shot first. See more »

Goofs

The bush they hide behind when they meet the friendly bushman is the same bush they hide behind later when avoiding the tracker. See more »

Quotes

Maud: [to Molly] See that bird? That's the spirit bird. He will always look after you.
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Crazy Credits

The painting songs sung by the Walpiri, Amatjere and Wangajunka women were not sacred songs, but were songs able to be performed in public. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Gulpilil: One Red Blood (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Gracie's Recapture
Keyboards by Chuck Norman
Percussion: Adzido
Didgeridoo: Ganga Giri
Whistle: Richard Evans
Violin: Gavyn Wright (as Gavin Wright), Jackie Shave
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User Reviews

 
Statement movie about a bad chapter in Australian history
3 November 2002 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Official policy between 1910 and 1970 in Australia allowed half-caste Aborigine children to be forcibly removed from their families and incarcerated ‘for their own' good in training schools where their were educated to become fitting servants for white families. This institutionalised eugenics, still recent enough to be remembered by its victims, is still a controversial issue in Australia where the PM John Howard refuses to give an official apology. The film has been doing very well in Australia. The story follows three such girls who are forcibly re-located but escape, and follow the ‘rabbit-proof fence' on a 1500 mile journey back home. The title itself seems to echo not only the yellow brick road of the Wizard of Oz (another journey to reclaim one's wholeness) but the fence that was erected to contain animals – which is just how the Aborigine children are treated, albeit with the best intentions. The story was adapted from a book by the daughter of the youngest surviving half-cast Aborigine portrayed in the film – the actual child actors had mostly never seen a motion picture before let alone acted in one.


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