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Hart's War (2002) - Plot Summary Poster

(2002)

Plot Summary

  • Fourth-generation Army Col. William McNamara is imprisoned in a brutal German POW camp. Still, as the senior-ranking American officer, he commands his fellow inmates, keeping a sense of honor alive in a place where honor is easy to destroy, all under the dangerous eye of the Luftwafe vetran Col. Wilhelm Visser. Never giving up the fight to win the war, McNamara is silently planning, waiting for his moment to strike back at the enemy. A murder in the camp gives him the chance to set a risky plan in motion. With a court martial to keep Visser and the Germans distracted, McNamara orchestrates a cunning scheme to escape and destroy a nearby munitions plant, enlisting the unwitting help of young Lt. Tommy Hart. Together with his men, McNamara uses a hero's resolve to carry out his mission, ultimately forced to weigh the value of his life against the good of his country.

    - Written by Press kit
  • In the last months of the Second World War, an American administrative Lieutenant is captured by German forces during the Battle of the Bulge. Sent to a German Stalag Prison camp, Lieutenant Hart is at once thrust into the social order of POWs, where every man thinks of himself first with bribery and trading with German captors commonplace. When two African American pilots become the first non-white soldiers in the camp, one is murdered and the other accused of killing a white sergeant. Lieutenant Hart must then defend the black pilot against charges before an obviously racist American tribunal; unaware that the trial itself is only a front for the real secret of the prison camp.

    - Written by Anthony Hughes <husnock31@hotmail.com>
  • Shortly before the end of World War II, young, bright-eyed, First-Lieutenant Thomas Hart, a third-generation desk-warrior, is stationed in an office miles away from any fighting. He meets the war only by accident and is taken prisoner. During interrogation, Hart faces a test of honor, courage, and sacrifice he had not prepared for. Surviving the interrogation, the horrified Hart witnesses courage and honor in the acts of his fellow-prisoners, who save him from certain death by sacrificing their belongings and even their own lives. At the POW camp, Hart learns that courage, sacrifice, and honor are much harder to find, as men become embittered in their captivity. Instead, fraternization, opportunism, and racism abound, ever-encouraged by the murderous Nazis, lead by a grounded Luftwaffe colonel; and mostly tolerated by the senior-ranking American colonel, in spite of his being a 4th-generation military offcer. Col. McNamara, mostly indifferent to the goings-on of his Americans, defiantly draws the line at racism, saluting even the Russian "Untermenschen" in the neighboring compound. But this line becomes much less distinct as two downed African-American pilots join him in the American compound. Suddenly, American racism manifests itself and escalates until one of the pilots is murdered, and the other is accused of murdering one of the racist conspirators. A law-student before the war, Hart is appointed by McNamara to "defend" the court-marshalled pilot, where Hart learns that McNamara has taken great pains to guarantee a verdict of "guilty" against the lone African-American. For many prisoners, the war would be over. For Hart, it has barely begun, as he fights to find within himself the courage and honor that seems to be completely lost within the camp, and only to be had among the dead and the condemned.

    - Written by The Bright & Famous Cucumber
  • A law student becomes a lieutenant during World War II, is captured and asked to defend a black prisoner of war falsely accused of murder.

    - Written by Anonymous

Synopsis

Belgium, December 16, 1944: First Lieutenant Thomas Hart (Farrell) is captured by German commandos during the opening of the Battle of the Bulge. Taken to a local prison...

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