A young American woman contracts a disastrous marriage in 19th century Italy.
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1968  
1 win. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Ralph Touchett 6 episodes, 1968
...
 Isabel Archer / ... 6 episodes, 1968
...
 Henrietta Stackpole 6 episodes, 1968
Beatrix Lehmann ...
 Mrs. Lydia Touchett 5 episodes, 1968
...
 Madame Merle 4 episodes, 1968
James Maxwell ...
 Gilbert Osmond 4 episodes, 1968
...
 Countess Gemini 4 episodes, 1968
...
 Caspar Goodwood 4 episodes, 1968
...
 Lord Warburton 4 episodes, 1968
...
Angus MacKay ...
 Mr. Bantling 3 episodes, 1968
Edit

Storyline

A young American woman contracts a disastrous marriage in 19th century Italy.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on novel | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 January 1968 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(6 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Madame Merle and Pansy are played by real-life mother and daughter, Rachel Gurney and Sharon Gurney. See more »

Connections

Version of The Portrait of a Lady (1996) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A must for James fans!
4 May 2001 | by ((London, England)) – See all my reviews

First and foremost, I must praise the screenplay by Jack ('I, Claudius') Pulman, which captures James' world so perfectly. James has a remarkably unsentimental view of his characters, presenting his 'heroes' and 'villains' in equally fascinating shades of grey. Beatrix Lehmann and Kathleen ('Black Narcissus') Byron are marvellous as two of the 'good' characters who take no trouble to be liked (cf Rachel Gurney's charming Madame Merle)- perhaps James Maxwell's 'villain' needs to be a little more charming if we are not to take Isabel for a fool. Perhaps also Suzanne Neve is a little opaque as Isabel - but that's almost the point. Richard Chamberlain and Edward Fox are both excellent as her lordly suitor and sickly cousin and benefactor respectively. True, the studio-bound video camerawork looks dated - this was a very early colour production - and I quickly stopped remarking on it. And as a James fan who's sat through numerous glossy film adaptations which got nowhere near his wonderfully ambiguous heart, the reissue of this version on BBC Video is a cause for celebration - I've watched it at least three times, and enjoyed it more each time. Can we now have Pulman's 'The Golden Bowl', please?


9 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page