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Neil Patrick Harris Talks About Staying Fit — Plus the One Athletic Challenge He’d Never Accept

  • PEOPLE.com
Neil Patrick Harris Talks About Staying Fit — Plus the One Athletic Challenge He’d Never Accept
He may be fit, but you won’t find Neil Patrick Harris doing an Ironman anytime soon. A regular triathalon, though? That’s another story.

“I’ve always wanted to do a triathlon,” Harris, 44, told People after a fitness event with Cigna led by his personal trainer, Alex Dropo. “But not run a whole marathon and then bike a hundred miles. That’s crazy.”

Harris is all about challenging himself physically and changing up his workout routine but says his focus is on longevity, not muscle gain. And for that, he looks somewhere unexpected.

“I’m so impressed with the bodies of circus performers,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

John Cameron Mitchell to Host IFP Gotham Awards

John Cameron Mitchell to Host IFP Gotham Awards
John Cameron Mitchell will host the 2017 Independent Filmmaker Project Gotham Awards, the indie-film centric event that is one of the earliest events on the film awards season calendar.

Mitchell is best known for writing and starring in the stage and screen musical “Hedwig and the Angry Inch.” His latest project, “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” stars Elle Fanning, Alex Sharp, and Nicole Kidman. The film premiered at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival and will be released in 2018.

“We eagerly anticipate a fun, exciting and entertaining night with John Cameron Mitchell leading us through it,” Joana Vicente, executive director of Ifp and the Made in NY Media Center, said in a statement. “John’s unique gift to entertain will be a brilliant addition to the lineup of stellar tributes and to the highly anticipated movies and nominees of 2017.”

The Ifp Gotham Awards recognizes independent films and their writers, directors, producers, and actors with 10 award categories.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host

John Cameron Mitchell will host this year's Gotham Awards, it was announced Wednesday.

Mitchell wrote and starred in the original off-Broadway production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. He adapted the musical into a movie in 2001, which earned him a Gotham Award for best directorial debut. And he reprised his role as Hedwig when the musical opened on Broadway in 2014, winning a special Tony Award in 2015 for his return to the role.

Mitchell also directed the 2011 film version of Rabbit Hole, produced by and starring Nicole Kidman, who is set to receive the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host

Gotham Awards: John Cameron Mitchell to Host
John Cameron Mitchell will host this year's Gotham Awards, it was announced Wednesday.

Mitchell wrote and starred in the original off-Broadway production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. He adapted the musical into a movie in 2001, which earned him a Gotham Award for best directorial debut. And he reprised his role as Hedwig when the musical opened on Broadway in 2014, winning a special Tony Award in 2015 for his return to the role.

Mitchell also directed the 2011 film version of Rabbit Hole, produced by and starring Nicole Kidman, who is set to receive the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Trailer Watch: Alien Elle Fanning Discovers Punk Music in “How to Talk to Girls at Parties”

How to Talk to Girls at Parties

The trailer for the 1977 London-set “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” begins with Enn (Alex Sharp, Marti Noxon’s “To the Bone”) and his friends attending a concert’s after-party. Hoping to meet some girls, the three punk music lovers encounter Zan (Elle Fanning) and her cohort of orange leather-clad, six-fingered, monotone friends. “They must be from California,” Enn’s buddy guesses. He’s not that off: Zan and company are actually aliens from outer space.

Zan and her fellow extraterrestrials, including Stella (Ruth Wilson, “The Affair”), are visiting Earth a rite of passage — but Zan is bored and ready to break away. In frustration, she cuts up her futuristic dress with a pair of scissors. “Do more punk to me,” she says as she hands the scissors to Enn.

Enn is happy to introduce Zan to London’s punk scene, as is its leader, Boadicea (Nicole Kidman). In punk music you have to “smash the oppressor, tell the truth, be an original, blah blah blah,” Boadicea explains to Zan. And as she falls more in love with punk culture and Enn, Zan realizes she’ll eventually have to speak her truth and choose between Earth and her own planet.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties” is directed by John Cameron Mitchell (“Hedwig and the Angry Inch”), who penned the script with Philippa Goslett (“Little Ashes”) from a Neil Gaiman short story. Mitchell previously directed Kidman in the 2010 drama “Rabbit Hole.” “How to Talk to Girls” made its world premiere earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival. It opens theatrically in Japan on December 1, but doesn’t have a U.S. release date yet.

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Trailer Watch: Alien Elle Fanning Discovers Punk Music in “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

TVLine Items: Supernatural Casts New Michael, Will & Grace Guests and More

TVLine Items: Supernatural Casts New Michael, Will & Grace Guests and More
Supernatural is giving the archangel Michael a makeover in Season 13.

Christian Keyes (Let’s Stay Together) will portray the character — last seen using Jake Abel’s Adam as his vessel in Season 5 — when it’s revealed that Michael is not only alive in the apocalypse world, but is also a Genghis Khan-like conqueror, EW.com reports.

Could Michael be the show’s new Big Bad? Executive producer Andrew Dabb previously teased that Dean and Sam’s biggest threat in Season 13 will be “an old — let’s call him friend — who we have not seen for many years” and who hails from the alternate world.
See full article at TVLine.com »

TNT's 'Snowpiercer' Reboot Adds Tony Winner Lena Hall (Exclusive)

TNT's Snowpiercer reboot has enlisted the services of a Tony winner and Grammy nominee.

Lena Hall, who earned a Tony for her role as Yitzhak in 2014's Hedwig and the Angry Inch, has joined the cast of the drama pilot.

Based on the 2013 film starring Chris Evans and Tilda SwintonSnowpiercer is described as a futuristic thriller set seven years after the world has become a frozen wasteland and the remnants of humanity inhabit a gigantic, perpetually moving train that circles the globe. Class warfare, social injustice and the politics of survival are questioned in this riveting television adaptation.

Hall will...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Miriam Shor’s Blog: How (and Why) I Handle Traveling Overseas with My Kids

  • PEOPLE.com
Miriam Shor’s Blog: How (and Why) I Handle Traveling Overseas with My Kids
Please welcome our newest celebrity blogger, Miriam Shor!

Shor currently stars in the TV Land series Younger alongside Sutton Foster and Hilary Duff. Other notable television credits include appearances on Jessica Jones, The Good Wife, My Name Is Earl and a main role on the 2008 CBS drama Swingtown.

The actress and singer has appeared many times on stage — perhaps most notably in an off-Broadway production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, later reprising her role of Yitzhak in the 2001 film adaptation and lending her voice to its Grammy-nominated soundtrack.

Shor, 46, is married to Justin Hagan, and they share two daughters: Iris,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Younger’ Star Miriam Shor on Diana’s Complicated Romance, Trouble at Work, and Learning the Truth about Liza

‘Younger’ Star Miriam Shor on Diana’s Complicated Romance, Trouble at Work, and Learning the Truth about Liza
As Diana Trout on TV Land’s “Younger,” Miriam Shor has had to embody a polished, put-together publishing executive who commands respect. When the show debuted, she was in the ultimate power position, holding Liza’s (Sutton Foster) future in her hands simply by deciding whether to hire her as an assistant. As seasons have gone on, though, she has gotten to let her guard down occasionally to showcase a softer side.

“She’s still a difficult boss. She has her challenges. But just when you think you know how she’s going to react to something, or how she’s going to behave in a situation, there’s a humanity that comes through, and it’s a joy to play,” Shor tells Variety.

Now in its fourth season, “Younger” is exploring a far more vulnerable side to Diana by putting her in a relationship that at first glance seems healthy — but hints at troubles she’s
See full article at Variety - TV News »

L.A. Now Casting: Join the Cast of a New Rock Opera + More Gigs

A new “sexy, outrageous, [and] irreverent” rock opera is looking for Los Angeles talent for fall shows! Casting is currently underway for the new rock and roll burlesque, which compares itself to “The Rocky Horror Show,” “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” and “The Book of Mormon.” The show is seeking male/female/non-binary talent aged 18 and older to fill several principal and ensemble supporting roles, including the lead role of Doktor Funster, a “self-proclaimed inventor of psychoanalysis…with a penchant for blatant sexual innuendo and the absurd.” Actors should be able to sing, dance, and move well. Range and vocal style is tailored to specific roles. The production will rehearse in Los Angeles for shows to run in the fall. Pay is Tbd. Get ready to rock and apply directly at Backstage here! Check out Backstage’s Los Angeles audition listings!
See full article at Backstage »

Film Review: ‘Becks’

Film Review: ‘Becks’
Becks” is the kind of modest, non-earthshaking indie enterprise that ends up being so satisfying mostly because it’s about a character type familiar from real life but all too under-represented at the movies. In this case, that’s a woman — played with consummate lived-in assurance by Broadway veteran Lena Hall — whose primary personality traits would be considered banally typical if she were a slacker-type dude, yet they can still seem exotic and frightening to some when they come in the form of a young lesbian.

A not-yet-successful musician who parties too hard, horndogs too much and seeks gainful employment too little, Becks (née Rebecca) might be a staple in any gay scene. Still, she remains a stubborn outsider in the hometown she’s been forced back to in Elizabeth Rohrbaugh and Daniel Powell’s narrative feature debut. What happens during her stay there is not particularly surprising or original, but
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Prepare to Have Your Darren Criss Obsession Reignited With These Snaps

  • Popsugar
Prepare to Have Your Darren Criss Obsession Reignited With These Snaps
Darren Criss first stole our hearts with his role on Glee - and for some dedicated fans with his role in A Very Potter Musical - and not much has changed since. After wrapping the hit Fox series, the handsome actor has been keeping busy performing as the title character in Hedwig and the Angry Inch and even playing Prince Eric in the Hollywood Bowl's performance of The Little Mermaid. While we've certainly loved hearing his beautiful voice on stage, there's a big part of us that misses seeing his equally beautiful face on our screens week after week. We are fully pumped to see him reunite with Glee creator Ryan Murphy for American Crime Story season two. In preparation for his return to TV, look back at how much more attractive Darren has gotten since saying goodbye to Blaine Anderson in 2015. RelatedLooking at Darren Criss Showering in a Speedo Should Be Your No. 1 Priority
See full article at Popsugar »

The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’
It’s no secret that sex sells, and movies are no exception. But while plenty of films like to show gratuitous sex, they’re not always very good. That’s a problem, since movies have the power to shape not only the cultural norms, but personal ones. And what could be more personal than sex? Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience, not some sensational or shameful ploy to sell tickets (though it doesn’t hurt).

That’s why we think it’s important to single out the very best films that also happen to be incredibly sexy, titillating, and provocative. These are not only some of our favorite films in general, but they’re films that celebrate the broad spectrum of human sexuality while telling stories as cinematic as they are personal. Some don’t have any sex scenes at all, while some are notoriously near-pornographic. When these movies do show sex it is always in service of the story, and always in order to challenge, subvert, or celebrate contemporary beliefs about sexuality.

Turn on (and get turned on) by our list of the 25 best sexy movies of the 21st century (well, so far). You know you want to.

25. “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008)

Undeniably sexy and amusing at once, Woody Allen’s 2008 Spain-set dramedy delights in pushing its various players into all sorts of romantic permutations and configurations. Anchored by Scarlett Johansson in a sneaky performance as the eponymous Cristina (pre-breakout Rebecca Hall is her best pal Vicky), the film follows a pair of friends as they meet and make lots of love with the beguiling Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who isn’t at all thrown off by the possibility of having two lovely ladies in his bed. In fact, he’s got another one to think about too, his free-spirited ex-wife (Penelope Cruz), who he just can’t get out of his head (or heart). On the surface, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” is a dead sexy romp about free-wheeling love-makers (complete with plenty of naughty bits), but it’s also a film that boldly explores issues of fluidity and fidelity with an uncharacteristically easy touch. -Ke

24. “Shortbus” (2006)

With its three-person blowjob circle, non-simulated sex scenes including ejaculation, and close-up of a pee stream unleashing into a bathtub, “Shortbus” is not for everyone. It’s an ambitious film, one that attempts to have fun, be sexy, and tell a good story. If anyone could pull it off, it would be the man behind “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” John Cameron Mitchell. “Shortbus” feels as much like an ensemble comedy as a playful experiment, though the two main characters are a sex therapist who’s never had an orgasm and a retired gay sex worker experimenting with opening up his relationship. With their partners, they both begin attending a weekly artist and sex salon, each hoping inspiration will strike. Mitchell wanted to use sex in new cinematic ways, “because it’s too interesting to be left to porn.” If it’s interesting sex you want, “Shortbus” has got it. -Jd

23. “Brokeback Mountain” (2005)

The end of this film is so movingly profound that your memory of it might not be that it was all that sexy. The love between these two men, buried under their rugged cowboy exteriors, ends with what can only be described as a sense of life-defining tragedy. Yet it is those brief moments where they let themselves go and unleash their animalistic passion, which “Crouching Tiger” director Ang Lee captures in his normal visceral fashion, that add a level of eroticism and physically affection that nearly makes all the pain worth it. Ennis and Jack rotate from almost fighting, as they pull at each others’ denim-clad exterior, to moments of being naked and incredibly tender. It’s virtually every cowboy fantasy rolled up into one. That they can only be themselves in the privacy of the great outdoors makes everything that much more liberating. Watching this film in 2005 felt taboo and rebellious, which resulted in a charged atmosphere in packed mainstream cineplexes around the country. -Co

22. “In the Cut” (2003)

Jane Campion’s handle on female desire has always been one of her best attributes as a director (and she’s got a lot of them), but nothing in her filmography is as overtly sexy and emotionally challenging as her 2003 Meg Ryan-starrer “In the Cut” (and that includes “The Piano,” which has a sexiness and eroticism all its own). Our first introduction to Ryan’s character is rooted in her coming to heady terms with her own sexuality, a theme that carries over throughout the often grisly drama. Increasingly drawn to Mark Ruffalo as a moody detective looking to solve a local murder that Frannie is tangentially involved in, Ryan’s character pushes the boundaries of “acceptable” desire. It’s a theme that Campion giddily plays into with some of modern cinema’s most satisfying and profound sex scenes, many of which center on — gasp — Frannie’s own pleasure over that of Ruffalo’s character. -Ke

21. “Hustle & Flow” (2005)

Craig Brewer’s crowdpleaser about a pimp dreaming of music fame is anchored by strong performances from Terrence Howard, Taraji P. Henson, and Taryn Manning. Howard plays Djay, while Henson and Manning are Shug and Nola, two of his girls. Hot-tempered and passionate, Djay begins making tracks with his friend Key (Anthony Anderson), and discovers he has a gift for lyrics. The catchy original soundtrack helps sell the story, as Djay’s songs seem to actually have a chance at getting radio play. While the strip club setting provides ample shots of semi-nude women, Djay and Shug’s sweet romance gives the film its emotional core and shows a softer side to Djay (and his temper). Their undeniable chemistry leads the previously timid Shug to throw down a sexy hook, her raspy croon on “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” making Henson’s star power glaringly obvious. -Jd

20. “Beyond the Lights” (2014)

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker. The pair exhibit major fireworks from the start, imagining Mbatha-Raw as hot new pop star Noni Jean, a big talent who is dangerously close to burning out and fading away, before she falls into the protective arms Parker’s do-gooder cop, Kaz Nicol. Prince-Bythewood’s film cannily sneaks in big questions about fame and the entertainment industry, along with issues regarding what’s actually sexy (Noni Jean is frequently kitted out in teensy costumes that make record execs happy, while diminishing her own humanity with every stitch), deep issues that are lovingly cradled by full-scale love story. When the pair finally give into their obvious attraction, “Beyond the Lights” pulls out the big guns, all gauzy love scenes and one particularly hot trip to Mexico, but the film maintains its sensuality by remembering that nothing is so sexy as mutual respect and admiration. -Ke

19. “In the Mood for Love” (2000)

Every Wong Kar-wai movie contains a kind of visual sensuality in every frame, but “In the Mood for Love” goes one step further — its slow-burning romance between a pair of would-be lovers who live across the hall from each other in sixties-era Hong Kong is rich with unobtainable desire. Much is left unsaid and unachieved about the fantasy of an extramarital affair shared by Chow Mo-wan (Tony Leung) and Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung), but the hints of attraction between them, unfolding in small gestures and passing glances, imbues each scene with the intensity of emotions specific to a period of repression. It’s a grand tragedy of issed opportunities framed by erotic implications. —Eric Kohn

18. “Ex Machina” (2014)

If you like high-tech voyeurism and intellectual sparring, you might find Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi thriller unearthing some hidden desires. An affable young programmer, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), is invited to the secluded jungle home of the CEO of his company, Nathan (Oscar Isaac) to participate in a top-secret experiment. Nathan wants to know if the cyborg he has been developing, Ava (Alicia Vikander) can convince Caleb that she has real consciousness. The tension is ripe between Nathan and Caleb as each attempts to alternately impress and control the other, but it is Caleb’s obsession with saving Ava that raises questions about the hero myth. Ava is the embodiment of male fantasy, trapped within a body invented to please and serve. As the two men fight over who best understands her mind, it turns out Ava was pulling the strings all along. There’s nothing sexier than a woman in charge. -Jd

17. “Quills” (2000)

It’s easy enough to get sucked into “Quills” based on the promise of Joaquin Phoenix playing an earnest (and incredibly sexy) young priest tempted by his attraction to a chambermaid. But somehow, much like Kate Winslet’s Madeline, we fall under the spell of the charismatic Geoffrey Rush, who plays his role as the Marquis de Sade with a deliciously dirty panache befitting the notorious French writer. The Marquis’ libertine ways run counter to the no-nonsense Royer-Collard (Michael Caine), who takes over the asylum with the intention of stifling the writer’s creative output. But even his own wife is no match for the words of the Marquis, which ooze both sensuality and liberty. Before long, any initial apprehension to the Marquis de Sade (he is a dirty old man, after all) is fully given over to the hope that his debauchery will win out, and that his desire, as well as that of Madeline and Coulmier (Phoenix) will be fully fulfilled — even though we know this is impossible. -Jr

16. “A Bigger Splash” (2015)

Watching “A Bigger Splash” feels like observing a sizzling chess game of attraction. Luca Guadagnino sticks Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Dakota Johnson on the world’s most gorgeous island and lets the sparks fly. Swinton plays a world-famous rock singer vacationing with her lover, a chiseled Schoenaerts who is practically a walking and talking sculpture of male beauty. Their time together is disrupted by the arrival of the rocker’s former lover and his daughter, a promiscuous young 22-year-old. Each character is so ready to succumb to sexual desire and so pent up with sexual attraction that Guadagnino creates the ultimate emotional orgy. The fun is in seeing how each person uses their sexuality to outsmart the next. You’ll be seduced from the first frame to the last. It feels like you’re watching each actor for the very first time. -Zs

On the next page: wild adventures in Florida, some of the century’s most jaw-dropping pairings, and at least one murder.

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See full article at Indiewire »

The Water Cooler: Theme Park Vloggers, Reading ‘The Dark Tower’ For the First Time, and ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’ on Stage

  • Slash Film
The Water Cooler: Theme Park Vloggers, Reading ‘The Dark Tower’ For the First Time, and ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’ on Stage
Welcome to The Water Cooler, a weekly feature where the /Film staff is free to go off-topic and talk about everything except the movies and TV shows they normally write about. In this edition: a very entertaining videoblogger who regularly gives theme park updates, revisiting the 2013 Tomb Raiderr video game, reading Stephen King’s The Gunslinger for the first time, witnessing […]

The post The Water Cooler: Theme Park Vloggers, Reading ‘The Dark Tower’ For the First Time, and ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’ on Stage appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Cannes Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ is an Alienating Misfire

John Cameron Mitchell is a more-than-talented writer-director whose first three features (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Shortbus, and Rabbit Hole) have all contributed to making him a distinct voice in American cinema. Perhaps it can be attributed to a slimming movie market, or maybe that there just wasn’t anything developing creatively for him, but he hasn’t directed a feature in seven years. If How to Talk to Girls at Parties is what he perceived as a comeback vehicle, Mitchell made an ill-suited choice, as his latest film offers a thinly-sketched culture clash that misses the romanticism of its source material.

Based on the 2006 short story by novelist Neil Gaiman, How to Talk to Girls at Parties is both an ode to punk rock and to 1970s sci-fi, especially 1976’s The Man Who Fell to Earth. The film tells the story of Enn (Alex Sharp), a punk enthusiast who
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscar Martinez to Star in Family Drama ‘Tu Me Manques’ (Exclusive)

Oscar Martinez to Star in Family Drama ‘Tu Me Manques’ (Exclusive)
Argentinian actor Oscar Martinez will star in the family drama “Tu Me Manques” (“I Miss You”), which will be shot this summer in New York and Bolivia.

Martinez, who won the best actor award at the Venice Film Festival for “The Distinguished Citizen,” will play a wealthy man from Bolivia with old school values, who learns about his gay son’s recent suicide in the U.S. While browsing through the son’s computer, he strikes up a conversation by mistake with his son’s boyfriend. The subsequent heated exchange prompts him to travel to New York looking for answers.

Rodrigo Bellott is directing from his own screenplay, adapting from his play, which premiered in Bolivia in 2015. The project was developed while Bellott was a Fellow in Queer/Art/Mentorship, the artist support program founded by filmmaker Ira Sachs in 2011. The Broadway rights were optioned by “Kinky Boots” and “Hedwig and the Angry Inch
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes 2017: How to Talk to Girls at Parties Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Jo-Ann Titmarsh

There’s been a lot of anticipation for this film by John Cameron Mitchell, who brought us the entertaining Hedwig and the Angry Inch and the sombre and moving Rabbit Hole. Mitchell returns to the punk territory of the former, but unfortunately with less success.

We’re in Croydon in 1977. Punk is at its height and Queen Elizabeth II is celebrating her silver jubilee. This choice of 1977 gives the director plenty of Union Jacks and street parties to set against the iconic Sex Pistols song and record cover, which he uses consistently throughout the film. Our hero is Enn (Alex Sharp): he’s being raised by his single mum, his jazz musician dad having abandoned the family ship years earlier. With his two best mates, the chubby and cerebral John (Ethan Lawrence) and the Billy Idol lookalike Vic (Abraham Lewis), the three schoolboys have embraced punk.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes, Day 6: Punk Rock Aliens Party at Grand Palais; Sean Baker’s ‘Florida Project’ Shines

  • The Wrap
Cannes, Day 6: Punk Rock Aliens Party at Grand Palais; Sean Baker’s ‘Florida Project’ Shines
Didn’t you miss John Cameron Mitchell? The loud and proud auteur has been dabbling here and there with short films, producing, script and story polishing — but the “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” filmmaker hasn’t given us a significant feature since 2010’s stark “Rabbit Hole.” He’s back with an army of ambiguous millennials, and a much more joyous reteam with Nicole Kidman. More good news? Sean Baker has successfully captured the joy and abject poverty of Florida as he did for the trans sex workers of East Hollywood, to meaningful effect. Let’s do this, Lundi. How to Disrupt Cannes?
See full article at The Wrap »

‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ With Elle Fanning & Nicole Kidman Is Gloriously Bananas [Cannes Review]

  • The Playlist
A hodgepodge of genres is splattered all over John Cameron Mitchell’s ludicrous (and ludicrously-titled) “How To Talk to Girls at Parties,” making for an incredibly brazen, outlandish, and totally bananas time at the movies. The creative collision of author Neil Gaiman and the director of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” is a match made in bizarro world heaven as ‘Girls’ thrusts a conventional coming-of-age premise into a romance-horror-comedy-sci-fi blender with the top off, twists the knob to max-level, and blasts the angriest Sex Pistols song you’ve ever heard in your life.

Continue reading ‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ With Elle Fanning & Nicole Kidman Is Gloriously Bananas [Cannes Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Cannes Film Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’

Cannes Film Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’
There are a few crucial things to know about “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.” It’s the first feature John Cameron Mitchell has directed in seven years, as well as his fourth overall — after “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” (2001), “Shortbus” (2006), and the uncharacteristically gloomy “Rabbit Hole” (2010). It’s based on a 2006 short story by the author and graphic novelist Neil Gaiman. It’s a punked-out sci-fi period-piece romance set in the London suburb of Croydon during the run-up to Queen Elizabeth II’s 1977 Silver Jubilee celebration (the one the Sex Pistols crashed by sailing up the Thames playing “God Save the Queen”). It tells the story of Enn (Alex Sharp), a pogo-ing punk who’s really a sweet kid next door, and how he falls for Zan (Elle Fanning), who belongs to a mysterious alien cult. The other thing to say about “How to Talk to Girls at Parties
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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