Walter Rodgers, a northerner, was engaged to marry Cora Fletcher, daughter of a southern colonel. A lawn fete was in full swing at her home when word came of the firing on Fort Sumter. An ... See full summary »
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Walter Rodgers
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Cora Fletcher
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Storyline

Walter Rodgers, a northerner, was engaged to marry Cora Fletcher, daughter of a southern colonel. A lawn fete was in full swing at her home when word came of the firing on Fort Sumter. An exceedingly dramatic scene followed in which the Colonel swore eternal allegiance to the southern cause, followed enthusiastically by all the guests, with the single exception of Walter, who declared for the North though it cost him his sweetheart. He bade Cora an affectionate farewell and went to serve his country. Two years later Walter's troop of cavalry took up its quarters at the Fletcher home in spite of the protests of Walter, who tried to have the men quartered somewhere else. Willie they were there the Colonel became very effusive in his attentions to the beautiful Cora. Walter was unable to stand it any longer and knocked his captain down, a most serious offense. He was promptly arrested, court-martialed and sentenced to death. Seeing her lover about to be snatched away from her forever, ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

18 November 1911 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Romance of the Sixties  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Better in every way than the average picture of this same story
24 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Abraham Lincoln is not a hard part to play acceptably, if the actor is of the right build and well made up, in these wartime melodramas, at least. The part he plays is nearly always the same, to hear the romantic story from the lips of the heroine and to sign the pardon which will save the life of the soldier, be he Southern spy or Union officer under sentence of death at sunrise. In this case it is the latter. He had been condemned by a court martial for striking his colonel, a goaty, villainous character, who was insulting a Southern girl who, just before the war, had been the young man's sweetheart. The settings of this picture are more dignified and better in every way than the average picture of this same story, which, by the way, is usually liked. The only height reached by the acting is in the character of an old darkey servant. Lincoln is also done very well. The scenes are very pretty. - The Moving Picture World, December 2, 1911


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