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Governor C.C. Young Hails Greater Talkie Season (1930)

| Short | 1930 (USA)
Ronald Colman introduces the governor of California, who urges moviegoers to attend the cleaner, wholesome talkie films, rather than those that show the seamy side of life. Doing this will ... See full summary »
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Clement C. Young ...
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Ronald Colman introduces the governor of California, who urges moviegoers to attend the cleaner, wholesome talkie films, rather than those that show the seamy side of life. Doing this will show movie company executives that the public prefers them, and more of them will be produced. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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1930 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Governor C.C. Young, Accompanied by His Family, Hails Greater Talkie Season; Ronald Colman Expresses the Good Wishes of the Film Industry  »

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(Sepiatone)|

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1.37 : 1
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Film Buffs Only
13 May 2009 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Governor C.C. Young Hails Greater Talkie Season (1930)

** (out of 4)

Three minute short film was not only an early talkie but an early color picture as well. Actor Ronald Colman introduces California Governor Clement C. Young who stands up and speaks to the camera. The Governor tries to tell people that Hollywood can police itself to keep cinema clean and that they didn't need a Production Code. Of course, we know what would happen as Hollywood would avoid the "rules" laid down until 1934 when a P.C. was put in place. This really doesn't work too well as a short or as entertainment but it does remain interesting as a part of history. I couldn't help but wonder how much Hollywood had to pay this guy to get him in their pocket. This film certainly isn't a great piece of art but the history behind it makes it worth viewing by film buffs.


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