IMDb > George Carlin: Doin' It Again (1990) (TV)

George Carlin: Doin' It Again (1990) (TV) More at IMDbPro »

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George Carlin: Doin' It Again -- Doin' It Again is George Carlin's seventh live stand-up concert for HBO, taped at The State Theater in New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1990.

In Doin' It Again, the minutiae of everyday life is up for Carlin's hilarious interpretation as he takes on the best of the worst in all of us. From embarrassing underwear situations to people who announce their bathroom activities, nothing escapes this comedic veteran's watchful eye. Cancer, rape, stupid people, dogs, organ donor programs, when toilet paper became bathroom tissue, "pulling the plug," and offensive language all receives Carlin's special treatment in this uproarious performance.

Overview

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Release Date:
23 March 1990 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
George Carlin brings his comedy back to New Jersey and this time talks about Offensive Language, Euphemisms... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Comic Genius. See more (5 total) »

Cast

 

George Carlin ... Himself
Rocco Urbisci ... Interviewer (uncredited)

Directed by
Rocco Urbisci 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
George Carlin 

Produced by
Brenda Carlin .... executive producer
George Carlin .... executive producer
Lynne D'Ambrosio .... producer
Jerry Hamza .... producer
Suzanne Harold .... producer
Michael Hoffman .... producer
Kimber Rickabaugh .... producer
Ellen Silva .... producer
Rocco Urbisci .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
George Carlin 
Ros Davis 
 
Film Editing by
Richard 'Jake' Jacobson 
Edward Smith 
 
Production Design by
Bruce Ryan 
 
Art Direction by
Mitch Gill 
 
Makeup Department
Frances A. Kolar .... makeup designer
 
Production Management
Bob Livengood .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Ellen Brown .... associate director
 
Sound Department
Mike Cunningham .... utility sound
Terry Kulchar .... sound mixer
Jim Parente .... utility sound
Victor Smith .... utility sound
Jan Stief .... sound (as Jan Stieff)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Burdick .... camera operator
Bill Lance .... video tape operator
Joe Puthoff .... camera operator
Hector Ramirez .... camera operator
George Riesenberger .... lighting designer
Fred Roth .... camera operator
 
Other crew
Terry Adams .... supervisor
Stuart Allen .... technician
Doug Barry .... video
Kim Bromley .... unspecified assistant
George Carlin .... executive album producer
Gene Crowe .... technical director
Frank Lewis .... crew
Bill Murillo .... crew
Nancy Nash .... assistant to producers
Rose Riggins .... stage manager
 
Thanks
Bill Lutz .... special thanks
William Wright .... special thanks
 

Distributors

Additional Details

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Runtime:
60 min
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Did You Know?

Quotes:
George Carlin:I don't like words that hide the truth. I don't like words that conceal reality. I don't like euphemisms, or euphemistic language. And American English is loaded with euphemisms. Because Americans have a lot of trouble dealing with reality. Americans have trouble facing the truth. So they invent the kind of a soft language to protect themselves from it. And it gets worse with every generation. For some reason, it just keeps getting worse. I'll give you an example of that. There's a condition in combat, most people know about it, it's when a fighting person's nervous system has been stressed to its absolute peak and maximum, can't take any more input. The nervous system has either
[clicks his tounge]
George Carlin:snapped, or is about to snap. In the first World War, that condition was called "shell shock." Simple, honest, direct language. Two syllables. Shell shock. Almost sounds like the guns themselves. That was seventy years ago. Then a whole generation went by, and the second World War came along. And the very same combat condition was called "battle fatigue." Four syllables now. Takes a little longer to say, doesn't seem to hurt as much. "Fatigue" is a nicer word than "shock." Shell shock. Battle fatigue. Then we had the war in Korea in 1950. Madison Avenue was riding high by that time. And the very same combat condition was called "operational exhaustion."
[laughter]
George Carlin:Hey, we're up to eight syllables now! And the humanity has been completely squeezed out of the phrase, it's totally sterile now. Operational exhaustion, sounds like something that might happen to your car!
[laughter]
George Carlin:Then, of course, came the war in Vietnam, which has only been over for about sixteen or seventeen years. And thanks to the lies and deceit surrounding that war, I guess it's no surprise that the very same condition was called "post-traumatic stress disorder."
[laughter]
George Carlin:Still eight syllables, but we've added a hyphen! And the pain is completely buried under jargon. "Post-traumatic stress disorder." I'll bet you if we'd have still been calling it shell shock, some of those Vietnam veterans might have gotten the attention they needed at the time. I'll bet you that.
[applause]
[...]
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4 out of 5 people found the following review useful.
Comic Genius., 25 November 2005
Author: nycritic

Only George Carlin could create entire dissertations based on completely surreal situations concocted in his (self-proclaimed) sick mind. Only George Carlin could get away with talking about the issues he tackles and addressing the fact that we the listener, the audience, get offended much too easily -- that we're offense prone.

Carlin talks about the Words that Speak the Truth. Language is big with Carlin and he uses it like swords to attack his audience to not only extract the laughs but to shoot them with what's real and what's not; what we mean to say when we say what we mean. Addressing the uses of "words you can't call people" he expertly spews forth a barrage of epithets, which only make us more aware that we may be a little more racist than we would like to think ourselves as. The same time he talks about how our own language has evolved over the years: what once we called trailer homes, now we call mobile homes, partly-cloudy has become partly-sunny, cripples become physically challenged.

It's sometimes hard to laugh at Carlin. There are moments when instead of laughing, you stop and think: because he's saying the truth, and the truth "ain't pretty". The uncomfortable situations we find ourselves in, the ease in which one can offend feminists, the hilarity of rape (and the possibility that one day, instead of being called "rape victims" they will be names "involuntary sperm recipient" makes our use of political correctness questionable. Carlin has no limits and knows it. And boy, is it an event to watch him regurgitate his furious observations. You gotta love someone this crotchety who sees things in a particular way and who dares to "go there" where most comedians, even the hardcore ones, would not.

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