6.8/10
2,695
55 user 35 critic

Focus (2001)

PG-13 | | Drama, Romance | 2 May 2002 (Australia)
In the waning months of World War II, a man and his wife are mistakenly identified as Jews by their anti-Semitic Brooklyn neighbors. Suddenly the victims of religious and racial persecution... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Lawrence Newman
...
Gertrude Hart
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Mr. Finkelstein
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Fred (as Meat Loaf Aday)
Kay Hawtrey ...
Mrs. Newman
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Carlson
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Father Crighton
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Mr. Gargan
Arlene Meadows ...
Mrs. Dewitt
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Willy Doyle
Robert McCarrol ...
Meeting Hall Man (as Robert Mccarrol)
Shaun Austin-Olsen ...
Sullivan
...
Mr. Cole Stevens
B.J. McQueen ...
Mel
Conrad Bergschneider ...
Tough's Leader
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Storyline

In the waning months of World War II, a man and his wife are mistakenly identified as Jews by their anti-Semitic Brooklyn neighbors. Suddenly the victims of religious and racial persecution, they find themselves aligned with a local Jewish immigrant in a struggle for dignity and survival. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Everything Is About To Become Very Clear

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic material, violence and some sexual content | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 May 2002 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

Foco  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$24,139 (USA) (19 October 2001)

Gross:

$717,820 (USA) (15 March 2002)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Trailers for the film erroneously credit Meat Loaf and 'Michael Lee Aday.' See more »

Goofs

When Mr. Finklestein discovers the antisemitic note taped to his store window, it is attached with 3M "invisible/magic" tape developed in the 1970s. During the 1940s, cellophane tape was transparent, not translucent. See more »

Quotes

Lawrence 'Larry' Newman: Really, Gertrude, I never stop thinking about you. It's like I've been thinking about you for years. That's why you struck me so the first time I saw you.
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Crazy Credits

Thanks to the residents of Campbell Avenue & Wallace Avenue, Toronto, Ontario. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Shanghai Kiss (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

My First Love
Written by Ruth Lowe and Mack David (as David Mack)
Performed by Jan Garber's Orchestra
Published by Music Sales Corp. / Universal MCA Music Publishing
A Division of Universal Studios, Inc. (ASCAP)
Courtesy of Circle Records, New Orleans, LA
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User Reviews

Fine film of Arthur Miller novel.
20 June 2003 | by (Houston, Tx, USA, Earth) – See all my reviews

For many, perhaps Arthur Miller is most famous for his 4 1/2 years married to Marilyn Monroe. For me, it is his Death of a Salesman for which I did a lengthy report as a college assignment in the mid-60s. I had never heard of Focus, and it is a movie that few have seen. An interesting premise, well-executed. His WASP-ish everyman character in 1943 (during the war) comes under attack after he gets a pair of new eyeglasses, which apparently makes him "look Jewish." His Americanism is questioned, his garbage is overturned, is forced to quit his job, he gets thrown out of a union rally when he fails to stand up and clap, he and his wife get roughed up by thugs on the street at night. The film is an examination of our tolerance for prejudicial treatment of others, then our own reaction towards such treatment.

The critic Ebert has a fine and complete review. William Macy, David Paymer, Laura Dern, and Meat Loaf Aday are all fine in their roles. A worthwhile 106 minutes of thought-provoking entertainment. The DVD, which was a free loan from my local library, has a sharp picture and good use of DD 5.1 sound. There is a very interesting extra which includes Arthur Miller discussing his book and the movie.


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