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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 87 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Alternative Horror Movie Poster Designs with Clay

13 October 2014 12:19 PM, PDT | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

GeekTyrant reader Lizzie Campbell sent in these charming alternative movie posters that she created in homage to several classic horror movies. Those movies are Hellraiser, Donnie Darko, Frankenstein, Halloween 3: Season of the Witch, House of a Thousand Corpses, Ichi: The Killer, and Little Shop of Horrors. She recreated the characters of these movies using polymer clay and other mixed media. It's a fun style. Now if someone out there could take it a step further and recreate certain scenes from these films using claymation, that would be great You can see more of Campbell's work on her website Clay Disarray. 

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- Joey Paur

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Linktime Stories

8 October 2014 6:01 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Cinematically Insane #DontTouchTCM when it comes to Turner Broadcasting layoffs 

Richard Kelly, of Donnie Darko directing fame, lurves Gone Girl and write a whole epic essay about it while also touching on Eyes Wide Shut and Fincher's music videos

In Contention interviews cinematographer Robert Elswit (Inherent Vice, Nightcrawler)

Mnpp gives Quote of the Day to Michael B Jordan on his costumes for Fantastic Four. "snug"

Deadline Scarlett Johansson about to do an Edith Wharton miniseries that was originally supposed to be a Michelle Pfeiffer feature film in the 90s. *sniffle*

Empire first images of Mark Wahlberg, Jessica Lange and Brie Larson in The Gambler remake

Vulture the exact moment Jennifer Garner fell in love with Ben Affleck 

Antagony & Ecstacy on The Boxtrolls. Glad Tim loved it

Boston Globe Mark Wahlberg's compound is finished. Holy third nipple, is he planning to house everyone who has ever appeared in any of his movies? »

- NATHANIEL R

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Read This: Director Richard Kelly Breaks Down Fincher's 'Gone Girl'

7 October 2014 9:39 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"It all started with an Aerosmith video." As we head further into the awards season this year, we start to see the more challenging and thought-provoking films emerge. David Fincher's latest film Gone Girl, which just hit theaters this past weekend, is evoking some of the best writing about filmmaking, and about society, in a long time. It's starting a discussion that we've been afraid to have and yet the commentary so far has been invigorating. The latest must read discussion comes from fellow filmmaker Richard Kelly (of Donnie Darko, Southland Tales, The Box) who wrote a massive essay for Talkhouse Film analyizing Gone Girl and comparing it to Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut, Kubrick's final film which is beloved by critics as well. Kelly's essay, subtitled "A Study of Psychopathy in the Heteronormative Patriarchal Occult" found in full on Tumblr, is a fascinating and apt analysis of »

- Alex Billington

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Richard Kelly Says David Fincher's 'Gone Girl' Is A "Kindred Spirit" To Stanley Kubrick's 'Eyes Wide Shut'

7 October 2014 6:25 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The past year has seen James Franco play film critic, reviewing movies like “The Great Gatsby” and “Man Of Steel.” At the same time, The Talkhouse has made a name for itself by providing a space for artists to write about other artists, which is how the late great Lou Reed came to write about Kanye West’s Yeezus and how “Donnie Darko” director Richard Kelly has ended up writing about David Fincher’s much-discussed “Gone Girl.” Simultaneously posted on Tumblr, Kelly’s review of “Gone Girl” instead plays out as a sort of dissertation wherein Fincher’s examination (via Gillian Flynn’s amazing novel and screenplay) of a doomed marriage between incredibly flawed people is compared to another film dealing with a crumbling marriage, Stanley Kubrick’s “Eyes Wide Shut.” In Kelly’s own words, his piece is “an epic three-part spoiler-filled 4741 word essay” and dissects everything from what Kelly sees as the common. »

- Cain Rodriguez

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‘Donnie Darko’ director Richard Kelly reviews David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’

6 October 2014 2:00 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

I’ve always loved hearing filmmakers discuss movies. We’ve often printed interviews where we ask filmmakers about their favorite films and the /Filmcast has tried to bring on directors to review the latest big screen movies. That hasn’t been as constant of a feature as David Chen and I originally planned, because as it turns out, […]

The post ‘Donnie Darko’ director Richard Kelly reviews David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’ appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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Breaking the Fourth Wall: A Supercut

6 October 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

A lot of people see cinema as a way to capture reality. Quite frankly, I do not see it that way. It is an artificial medium, and everyone watching knows it. The capturing reality mindset is needed for some pictures, but it is not a hard and fast rule. I think filmmakers embracing film's artificiality can make for very interesting products. One of my favorite ways to highlight that is by directly breaking the fourth wall, a storytelling technique that addresses the audience in very a direct way. It can make them complicit in a nefarious plot. It can accuse them. It can bring them in on a joke. It is a very fun device to use, and, for the most part, it works when it's used. Below is a pretty fun supercut of breaking the fourth wall in movies. Here, though, breaking the fourth wall is translated as looking directly at the lens. »

- Mike Shutt

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Raindance 2014: WiNdOw LiCkEr Review

5 October 2014 11:40 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Brian McGuire

Starring: Brian McGuire, Bret Roberts, Nina Millan, James Duval, Farah Mokrani, Zach Green, Mark E. Fletcher, Logan Sparks.

Synopsis: WiNdOw LiCkEr, the journey of Ben Wild, into a new form of insanity, that no man has ever experienced before. Through addiction to prescription drugs, reality television, video games, & cam girls, can Ben Wild get to the root of himself?

Ever watched a film so bizarre that you thought you might have been on drugs while watching it? That’s how you feel when watching Brian McGuire’s latest Window Licker, but don’t worry, if you do not feel like that by the end then you really did not get the film at all.

Even though McGuire’s films don’t take on traditional narrative anyway, Window Licker breaks down the narrative as more of a spiral rather than an easy step-by-step look. In the film we »

- Lucy Cave

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[Comic Execution] 10/3 – Aliens, Justice Inc, And Then Emily Was Gone

3 October 2014 6:28 AM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

This site is gonna be changing soon, getting a whole new look. It’s a big deal, as it hasn’t done so since I first started reading it two years ago, probably more than that though. But Comic Execution won’t change. I like this format too much. While I’d certainly like to expand my coverage of comics at Destroy The Brain, I think we’re lacking in general coverage as is, so until we have a bit more in the way of contributors, don’t expect much else besides the column and the occasional interview. I’d love to offer things like previews or contests but it’s proving difficult to get publishers to play ball. I really wanted to do a feature on the Alien/Prometheus/Predator crossover but Dark Horse never responded so instead I’m just doing basic reviews. Which is kind of nice »

- Chris Melkus

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Guest Editorial: Noam Little on “Askew: Tusk, Bh Tilt and The Hypocrisy of Horror Fandom”

24 September 2014 12:01 AM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

*Editor’s note- Noam Little was nice enough to write this very thought provoking article regarding the state of horror and how a combination of marketing, dumping films to VOD and horror fandom might be incredibly detrimental to the genre. Give it a read, it’s a good one!-Jerry

The year is 1931. Although the American Public at large is greatly affected by The Great Depression, a line of people stand outside New York’s Roxy Theatre with cash in hand. None of these people knew they were contributing to American Cinematic History, but by the end of the decade, an entire film studio would become a box office tyrannosaur thanks to several refined, masterful depictions of the horror genre. And yet staring at that line of people is a man of supposed high social standing, uninterested by the fascinating in immoral and undignified cinema as he makes his way to his local library. »

- Jerry Smith

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Music in Film: Wish I Was Here & Guardians Of The Galaxy

19 September 2014 1:23 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Wish I Was Here, Boyhood and Guardians Of The Galaxy take a mixtape approach to their soundtracks. Ivan looks at what makes them so great...

"You gotta hear this one song. It'll change your life, I swear," a girl (Sam) in a doctor's waiting room once said to a boy (Andrew) who looked a lot like Zach Braff. Then, she placed a pair of headphones over his ears and played him The Shins.

Garden State's soundtrack became a must-have for all fans in 2004 thanks to its effective use - and curation - of indie artists, acoustic ditties and mild electronica. It was an album that showed a jukebox soundtrack (traditionally the territory of Tarantino) could do something different, whether that was introducing people to obscure bands they hadn't heard of or connecting you with others who also liked the movie's music.

10 years later, filmmakers are still chasing the same thing: the ultimate mixtape. »

- ryanlambie

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Why Tobey Maguire Thinks There’s a Lack of Young Male Movie Stars

16 September 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

In a 2011 Vulture article, we sized up the sparse field of young leading men in the movies and plaintively asked, “Where Are the New Leos, Tobeys, and Jakes?” Three years later, that drought has only gotten worse. While the movies can boast a plentiful array of bankable female superstars under 25, including Jennifer Lawrence, Shailene Woodley, and Kristen Stewart, their male counterparts are meager, and there’s still no young man with an under-25 career comparable to the one had by Leonardo DiCaprio (who’d been Oscar-nominated for What’s Eating Gilbert Grape and toplined the then-biggest movie ever, Titanic, before turning 25), Tobey Maguire (who’d by that age starred in classics like The Ice Storm and The Cider House Rules), or Jake Gyllenhaal (who made Brokeback Mountain, Donnie Darko, and Jarhead before his 25th birthday).What gives? Vulture put the question to Tobey Maguire himself at the Toronto Film Festival, »

- Kyle Buchanan

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The Bottom Shelf: Frightfest, Faults and Killer Klowns

15 September 2014 12:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Indie horror Faults and Venezuelan chiller The House At The End Of Time are two of the films in this month's Bottom Shelf...

Summer holidays, barbecues on the beach and weekends decimated by relentless weddings: this is August for some. For other, more discerning types, it is about Frightfest, otherwise known as the chance to spend those rare sunny days ensconced in a darkened room for a horror movie marathon. This year’s Leicester Square event featured the usual mix of gonzo gore, copycat-killings and premiere screenings of future favourites; we managed to catch a few highlights.

The latest film from writer and director Riley Stearns (Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s husband, fact fans), Faults, received a European premiere last month. Massively enjoyable from start to finish, Stearns’ black comedy mostly eschews the genre necessity of scattergun bloody slayings in favour of an intelligent script focusing on the gaping voids left in desperate characters’ lives. »

- ryanlambie

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7 Movies You Can Watch to Replicate the Tiff Experience at Home

12 September 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

It can be quite magical to be at a large film festival. There are hundreds to choose from – heaps of beautiful films that will never again leave their home country, indie delights that will receive the most minimal distribution, and of course, a smattering of Hollywood forays into deeper subject matter. You can meet people from all over the world, hear filmmakers and casts give insights into their productions, and have a valid excuse to eat piles of junk food as you race between screenings. But after the fiftieth time someone pushes their reclining seat back so far that it’s pinned your legs to your own chair, or people come and go repeatedly throughout the movie, or someone pulls out their phone and someone else yells at them, or any of the other results of hundreds of people seeing countless films together, any film fiend will start to descend into madness and wish for the joys »

- Monika Bartyzel

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Nightcrawler | 2014 Tiff Review

8 September 2014 1:15 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

While the City Sleeps: Gyllenhaal Gets His Money Shot in Gilroy’s Debut

You’ll be hard pressed to find a more enjoyably witty criticism of modern exploitative media tactics taken to a new extreme than Dan Gilroy’s viciously adept directorial debut, Nightcrawler. Humanity’s morbid curiosity with the grisly, disturbing, and depraved happenings in the world around us has long tainted the art of journalism and mass media, and has thus been depicted for ages already in the cinema. Gilroy’s film owes as much to Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole (1951) as it does Sidney Lumet’s Network (1976), upping the action ante with the growing Gilroy stamp (his brother directed Michael Clayton and the last Bourne film). And yet, it’s an excitingly well written dark hearted treatise with a vitriolic little statement all its own, a glorious new love letter to the seedy underside of Los Angeles, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Get Trapped by this Teaser for the It's Hell Getting Old Segment of Hellevator Man

8 September 2014 9:45 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Getting stuck in an elevator is scary enough, but doing so with a bunch of senior citizens? You can be sure filmmaker Patrick Rea piles on the spooky - plus a little silly - in this teaser for his "It's Hell Getting Old" segment of the Hellevator Man anthology.

Kansas City-based Rea's short stars Kip Niven (Jayhawkers, New Year’s Evil), Joicie Appell (Nailbiter), Victor Raider-Wexler (Minority Report), and Nancy Marcy. It was executive produced by Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, Michael Biehn, and Lony Ruhmann.

The script, written by Rea, deals with four elderly people trapped in an elevator on their way to their 50th Class Reunion, and one of them may have forgotten to take some important medication.

The film was shot in Kansas City, Missouri, and the director of photography was Hanuman Brown-Eagle.

Other segments include Vincent J. Guastini's “The Future Executive,” which centers around Devi (Sushi Girl’s »

- Debi Moore

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Jake Gyllenhaal Plunges To Terrifying Psychological Depths In The Fantastic Nightcrawler

6 September 2014 11:39 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Somehow, Jake Gyllenhaal doesn.t get full credit for the chances he takes as an actor. And yet, this is a performer who burst on the scene in City Slickers, but boasts such incredible, daring and unconventional films as Donnie Darko, Brokeback Mountain, Jarhead, The Good Girl and David Fincher.s masterpiece, Zodiac. But the Dicaprios and Depps of the world get lauded for their high-profile risks, while Gyllenhaal keeps delivering with the likes of Prisoners or Enemy. The tide should turn in Gyllenhaal.s favor, finally, with Nightcrawler, a seedy, after-hours contemporary thriller about the insomniac ambulance chasers who record exclusive video at human tragedies, then sell them for top dollar to ratings-hungry local news producers. Louis Bloom (Gyllenhaal) is an out-of-work hustler, a hard-working fast talker who chases job opportunities around every corner. On the way home from a scavenger hunt . during which he sells stolen metals to »

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Casey La Scala Gives Us the Scoop on The Remaining

5 September 2014 9:35 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

Casey La Scala is best known as a producer of the legendary 2001 film Donnie Darko. Most recently, La Scala has written and directed an intriguing film entitled The Remaining, releasing today, and he sat down with Dread Central to discuss all the details.

Premiering at London Frightfest on August 25, The Remaining is an intriguing jaunt. We asked La Scala about his influences and inspirations for the film. "After my father died, I really started to question life, death and my own mortality," La Scala said.

"Watching my father die was a tough experience, but I learned the most important lesson," he continued. "I learned that life can end at a blink of an eye so it's important to live life like it's your last day on earth. Specifically, taking care of family and friends and making sure you have said everything you need to say. You could miss your chance. »

- Scott Hallam

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The Definitive ‘What the F**k?’ Movies: 30-21

2 September 2014 4:40 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

30. Conspirators of Pleasure (1996)

Directed by: Jan Švankmajer

We’ve already seen two films from Jan Švankmajeron the list, but this elaborate movie about a number of separate, but connected people takes the cake. Conspirators of Pleasure follows six people, each with their own incredibly unsettling fetish. A letter carrier ingests dough balls every night before bed. A clerk is obsessed with a new anchor and creates a machine that pleasure him while he watches her. That anchorwoman has an odd obsession with live carp. One customer of the clerk’s practice paper mâché voodoo with a chicken costume and a doll resembling his neighbor. The neighbor has a doll of him that she brutalizes. Finally, the anchormwoman’s husband rubs homemade contraptions to rub all over his body. Conspirators could simply be a character study that, while still strange, would not be nearly as creepy. Švankmajer’s known for his animation and puppetry, »

- Joshua Gaul

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Jake Gyllenhaal on Losing 30 Pounds and Himself in ‘Nightcrawler’

2 September 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jake Gyllenhaal has a razor-thin scar on the palm of his hand. It’s a permanent souvenir from the set of “Nightcrawler,” the Toronto Film Festival thriller, in which the actor plays a twisted crime paparazzo. On the Los Angeles shoot last fall, director Dan Gilroy was filming Gyllenhaal simmering alone in a house after his character, Lou, suffers a professional setback. “We were in the middle of a scene with a mirror,” Gyllenhaal recalls on a recent afternoon. “I hit the mirror.” The violent act wasn’t in the script, and Gyllenhaal still isn’t sure what propelled him to do it. “It was just a choice in that moment that happened,” says Gyllenhaal, who accidentally sliced open his hand on a shard of glass.

Doctors at Cedars-Sinai eventually stopped the bleeding and stitched him up, and Gyllenhaal returned to work eight hours later, with his wrist wrapped in gauze. »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 87 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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