5.2/10
92
8 user 4 critic

Shredder Orpheus (1990)

Skateboarder named Orpheus and friends go to Hell to stop television signals that are brainwashing America.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Orpheus
...
Eurydice
Steven Jesse Bernstein ...
Axel (as Stephen J. Bernstein)
Linda Severt ...
Scratch
Marshall Reid ...
Razoreus
Gian-Carlo Scandiuzzi ...
Hades
Vera McCaughan ...
Persephone
...
Linus
Brian Faker ...
EBN Producer
Whitey Shapiro ...
Apollo
Barb Benedetti ...
Calliope (as Barbara Benedetti)
Gypsy Mandelbaum ...
Oracle
Oscar Knudsen ...
Cerebrus
Tex Germany ...
Minister
Dennis Rea ...
The Shredders - Guitar
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Storyline

Skateboarder named Orpheus and friends go to Hell to stop television signals that are brainwashing America.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Skate-Rock Adventure of the Deadly Kind!

Genres:

Horror

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Details

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Release Date:

13 June 1990 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Worm Song
Written by Roland Barker
Lyrics by Robert McGinley
Performed by The Shredders
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User Reviews

 
Good for a cheap laugh and has some good trick skating in it.
25 June 2000 | by See all my reviews

This movie is one of my favorite cheesy movies. I stumbled upon this movie in a video store started in a trailer in the small town I live. (The store only lasted about 6 months max.) I've never been able to find a place to rent it again. I'll never forget the beginning when the "rock star/skater" sings a rock version of "Nobody likes me, everybody hates me, I think I'll eat some worms." It's all very simple but fun. Don't completely take my word for its entertainment, I haven't seen it in nearly ten years (I was 13 at the time) although my tastes have generally stayed the same.


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