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Windtalkers (2002) Poster

(2002)

Goofs

Anachronisms 

There is a 50-star US flag (instead of 48) at the Navajo enlistment ceremony.
When Sergeant Enders sits down with his food during the first time he meets the Navajo radio operators, for a brief moment a modern radar site on a mountain top comes into view.
In the Training scene where the code talkers are doing a transcription from an audio recording, we briefly see the machine playing the audio. The first Wire Recorder was not manufactured by Webster-Chicago until 1948. The machine used in Windtalkers is the "Webcor Model 181 Wire Recorder" which was not manufactured by Webster-Chicago until 1953. The movie is supposed to be set in the early 1940s.
The start of the Camp Pendleton sequence opens with a closeup of a 50-star U.S. flag which is incorrect for 1943, the year of the action. The closeup dissolves to an establishing shot of the camp's parade square where a correct, 48-star flag is visible on the mast. The U.S. would not require a 50-star flag until 1959.

Audio/visual unsynchronised 

Just before Pete Anderson joins Private Whitehorse in their flute/harmonica-duo, Whitehorse plays solo. However, the flute plays on, just for a second while he is clearly taking in air, and thus, obviously, cannot play.
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Character error 

When Ben Yahzee is leaving his family he shares a firm handshake with an elder. In Navajo culture personal contact is very limited. The handshake would have been a brief, light touch if given at all.

Continuity 

At the end of the film, a back-shot of Ben Yahzee's little boy shows a dog-tag chain around his collar, before Ben ever places the dog-tags around his neck.
When PVT Yahzee is pretending to be a Japanese soldier to get to the radio, he has the gun in the sergeant's back in the close-up, but in the long shot it is pointed up and to his left.
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When Enders is describing to Yahzee how he threw the first medal he received into the ocean, his raised hand alternates between right and left between shots.
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Crew or equipment visible 

The shadow of the camera crane is visible at the beginning of the Marine friendly-fire sequence when Enders' squad is getting out of the truck.
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Enders is receiving his mission briefing in the Admiral's office, you can see a blue-taped "X" on the floor indicating where the Admiral is supposed to stand at the scene.
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When Enders is pretending to be taken prisoner by Yahzee, and he goes to move behind Yahzee after being hit, you can see the shadow of a cameraman on the floor, moving with the shot.
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When the marines first land on Saipan there is a huge battle going on. Nicholas Cage stops to reload his Thompson and has a brief flashback to what happened to him on the Solomon islands. He then finishes reloading and runs up to a Japanese soldier who is on fire. If you look to the right of the screen as he is running, a man in all black is visible wearing goggles - obviously there for fire safety
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Factual errors 

Throughout the battle of Saipan, no Commissioned Officer is seen. The highest ranking character is the "Gunny" (a generic term for Marines above the rank of Sergeant). A Captain or a Major would be leading such an advance as is shown.
Most of the movie's characters are at least 10 to 15 years older than real front-line Marines.
The support ship at Saipan is shown as the U.S.S. Colorado. The correct designation is "USS", an acronym, not an abbreviation.
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The battleship firing in support of the troops on Saipan is identified as the USS Colorado. The Colorado's main battery was eight guns in four two-gun turrets. All of the scenes of a battleship show the three-gun turrets of an Iowa class battleship.
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Revealing mistakes 

In the final combat, just after the Japanese uncover their guns, one of them take a shot but the recoil is a good half second too late.
Just before the convoy is hit by the friendly artillery, the ground charge used to simulate the first shell impact can be seen as the truck drives past it.
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In the opening sequence, a man reacts to being shot by another man before the gun goes off.
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After the combat scene where Charlie is killed Ben looks at his body. Right when Charlie is shown you can see him swallow.
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Spoilers 

The goof items below may give away important plot points.

Continuity 

A little before Enders dies lying on the ground, there is blood gushing from his mouth (shot from above him), no blood (side shot), dried blood (next shot from above).
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Revealing mistakes 

After Enders' death, the close-up reveals him to be blinking.

See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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