6.0/10
59,533
458 user 150 critic

Windtalkers (2002)

R | | Action, Drama, War | 14 June 2002 (USA)
Two U.S. Marines in World War II are assigned to protect Navajo Marines, who use their native language as an unbreakable radio cypher.

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3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Fortino
Cameron Thor ...
Mertens
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Ear Doctor
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Colonel Hollings
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Storyline

During World War II when the Americans needed to find a secure method of communicating they devised a code using the Navajo language. So Navajos were recruited to become what they call code talkers. They would be assigned to a unit and would communicate with other units using the code so that even though the enemy could listen they couldn't understand what they were saying. And to insure that the code is protected men are assigned to protect it at all costs. One of these men is Joe Enders, a man who sustained an injury that can make him unfit for duty but he manages to avoid it and is told of his duty and that the man he is suppose to protect is Ben Yahzee. Initially there is tension but the two men learn to get along. Written by rcs0411@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

America Has The Last Word. See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive graphic war violence, and for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

14 June 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Wind Talkers  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$115,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$14,520,412, 16 June 2002, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$40,914,068

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$77,628,265
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Roger Willie was originally hired as a dialect coach to the cast on the Navajo language. But his screentests were so good, they ended up casting him opposite Christian Slater. See more »

Goofs

The shadow of the camera crane is visible at the beginning of the Marine friendly-fire sequence when Enders' squad is getting out of the truck. See more »

Quotes

Joe Enders: You think too much.
Private Chick: First time I've ever been accused of that.
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Connections

References Cross of Iron (1977) See more »

Soundtracks

What Shall We Do With A Drunken Sailor?
(as "Early in the Morning")
Traditional
Sung at the embarkation party
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The Director's Cut is an improvement
26 October 2005 | by See all my reviews

I just watched the director's cut on DVD after having seen the theatrical cut some time ago.

Plot summary: In WWII, a code based on the Navajo language was used to securely communicate between US troops in the Asian Pacific, without the Japanese eavesdropping. We follow two Navajo code talkers and their US Marine "bodyguards" as they go into combat on a Japanese island.

A lot has been written about this somewhat flawed John Woo movie. After having seen both versions, my main disappointment is still that the two code talkers seem like background characters. A movie with a lower budget, without big Hollywood stars put in the foreground would probably have been more satisfying. Maybe that movie should have been done by another director too, I don't know.

Enough good "general" war movies have been made. The code talker part of the story should have been made much more pivotal as was done here.

I'm a fan of Woo's Hong Kong and Hollywood work. The director's cut of Windtalkers doesn't turn a mediocre Woo film into a masterpiece, but it is certainly an improvement.

Main advantages of the DC are more fleshed out characters. You get more background on all main characters, including the two Navajo code talkers. I felt more involved. As a result, the code talker part of the story is served better, but still not enough to my taste. The DC also has more uncut battlefield scenes. Woo really shows his talent here, with raw yet beautifully shot war action. You get the sense that you are in the middle of the action.

I was particularly interested if a scene was put back in where a US soldier takes a golden tooth from a Japanese corpse. This scene was described in several documentaries about censorship by the US Army. Not completely surprisingly, this scene was also absent from the DC.

If you are a Woo fan or already appreciated the theatrical cut, it may be worth checking out the director's cut.

My ratings: 6/10 for the original cut. 8/10 for the director's cut.


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