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Hamlet (2000)

Not Rated | | Drama | TV Movie 10 December 2000
The classic Shakespeare tragedy is revisioned in America at the turn of the 20th Century. Campbell Scott (Singles, The Spanish Prisoner) adapted, co-directed and stars in the title role ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Hamlet
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Gertrude
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Polonius
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Ophelia
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Claudius
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Guildenstern
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Horatio
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Rosencrantz
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Ghost of Hamlet's Father / First Player
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Gravedigger
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Osric
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Fortinbras
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Laertes
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Bernardo
David Debesse ...
Francisco
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Storyline

The classic Shakespeare tragedy is revisioned in America at the turn of the 20th Century. Campbell Scott (Singles, The Spanish Prisoner) adapted, co-directed and stars in the title role with Tony Award winner Blair Brown (Copenhagen) as his mother Gertrude. Written by Anonymous

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Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Release Date:

10 December 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

I ekdikisi  »

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Version of Hamlet (2015) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Scott
16 July 2006 | by See all my reviews

This film has a lot of problems. It looks made for TV; it is overlong; the transposition to of the plot to 19th century America makes no sense. But the real weakness of the film is Cambell Scott.

The popularization of Freudian psychoanalysis has made it very easy to read Hamlet as neurotic; and very easy, too, to read his relationship with his mother as "Oedipal" fixation. Consequently, some readings of Hamlet have the whole play revolve around the question of whether Hamlet is mad, or just neurotic (and with good reason to be upset at his Step-dad).

All this should only remind us that Freudianism is a terrible trivialization of human personality.

If the reader really needs a one-sentence reduction of Hamlet it is this: Both Hamlet's father and his uncle-stepfather are barbarian bullies from Hell, and Hamlet is trying very hard not to be.

Notice that Mom of Denmark doesn't really show up in this equation. Nor does the avoidance of Hell seem to be an overly neurotic concern (certainly not for an Elizabethan).

Scott gives us a 20th century post-Freudian Hamlet. Of course the complex morality of the piece gets entirely lost.

Everybody here tries hard, but it's just not convincing.


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