7.1/10
9,131
164 user 20 critic

To End All Wars (2001)

A true story about four Allied POWs who endure harsh treatment from their Japanese captors during World War II while being forced to build a railroad through the Burmese jungle. Ultimately ... See full summary »

Writers:

(book), (screenplay)
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From $1.99 (HD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
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Maj. Ian Campbell
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Dusty Miller
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Sakae Kimura ...
Sgt. Ito
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Lt. Col. Stuart McLean
Masayuki Yui ...
Capt. Noguchi
John Gregg ...
Camp Doctor Coates
Shû Nakajima ...
Nagatomo (as Shu Nakajima)
...
Sgt. Roger Primrose (as Greg Ellis)
...
Lt. Foxworth
James McCarthy ...
Norman
...
Wallace Hamilton
Winton Nicholson ...
Duncan
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Storyline

A true story about four Allied POWs who endure harsh treatment from their Japanese captors during World War II while being forced to build a railroad through the Burmese jungle. Ultimately they find true freedom by forgiving their enemies. Based on the true story of Ernest Gordon. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

In war, you have to survive See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for war-related violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

2 September 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Última das Guerras  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV) | (TV)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(archive footage)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to the film's closing epilogue, after World War 2, Captain Ernest Gordon became Dean of the Chapel at Princeton University for twenty-six years (becoming the Reverend Ernest Gordon) whilst former Japanese Imperial Translator Takashi Nagase became a Buddhist monk. Moreover, fifty-five years after World War II, Gordon and former Nagase met at the Death Railway Cementery in Thailand, which is depicted in-part at the end of this film. See more »

Goofs

The camp in the film seems to hold about 200 prisoners. The real camps on the railway held 1000s. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Coates: [examining newly arrived POWs] Relish your health now, gentlemen: it's the last you'll see of it.
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Soundtracks

AMAZING GRACE
Traditional
Words by John Newton
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User Reviews

 
Wow! Totally surprised that this slipped by my radar
22 July 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

After repeated watchings my rating may go up. I love the movie THE THIN RED LINE and this movie reminded me of it strongly except it did not have the excellent cinematography that film did.

I watched it because I like Robert Carlyle a lot and was not disappointed by his performance or any other of the actors on both sides of the war. The pacing was perfect and the violence was very brutal and sometimes unexpected but effective.

The message it delivered to me made the movie for me. Loving thy enemy. Just realizing that we are all just humans caught up in something we didn't start. I highly recommend this movie if you like a film made with compassion.


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