À ma soeur!
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Fat Girl (2001) More at IMDbPro »À ma soeur! (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2016


Kentucky Family Discovers Their Adopted Daughter's Sister on Facebook - Now They're Urgently Trying to Adopt Her Before Time Runs Out

11 May 2016 8:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Lisa Lumpkins was scrolling through her Facebook newsfeed in February when she came across a picture of Avery, a teenage girl from China that looked strikingly similar to her adopted 12-year-old daughter Aubrey - both had cerebral palsy, sparkling eyes and toothy grins that "just melt your heart." The photo of Avery was posted by a volunteer at the same Shenzhen orphanage where Lisa and her husband, Gene Lumpkins, adopted Aubrey in 2013. The caption stated that she was still in the orphanage, looking to find her forever home. "My jaw dropped, they looked just so, so similar," Lisa, 43, tells People. »

- Rose Minutaglio, @RoseMinutaglio

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Kentucky Family Discovers Their Adopted Daughter's Sister on Facebook - Now They're Urgently Trying to Adopt Her Before Time Runs Out

11 May 2016 8:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Lisa Lumpkins was scrolling through her Facebook newsfeed in February when she came across a picture of Avery, a teenage girl from China that looked strikingly similar to her adopted 12-year-old daughter Aubrey - both had cerebral palsy, sparkling eyes and toothy grins that "just melt your heart." The photo of Avery was posted by a volunteer at the same Shenzhen orphanage where Lisa and her husband, Gene Lumpkins, adopted Aubrey in 2013. The caption stated that she was still in the orphanage, looking to find her forever home. "My jaw dropped, they looked just so, so similar," Lisa, 43, tells People. »

- Rose Minutaglio, @RoseMinutaglio

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Join Our Campaign and #ShareYourSize to Prove You're More Than Just a Number

27 April 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Join our movement! Just write your size on a piece of paper and strike a pose! You may be featured in People magazine or on People.com. Submit your photos by emailing them to shareyoursize@people.com, or by tagging #ShareYourSize on Twitter and Instagram. See the #ShareYourSize official rules.While women like Ashley Graham, Gina Rodriguez and Lena Dunham (to name a few) are making strides towards a greater acceptance for all body types, there's still a long way to go. So People is starting the #ShareYourSize campaign, in an effort to show that size is just a number »

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Disorder | 2016 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

7 March 2016 10:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Ground Control: Winocour Pours on the Paranoia with Tense Thriller

Director and screenwriter Alice Winocour crafts a sweaty-palmed, Ptsd inclined thriller with sophomore effort, Disorder. Somewhat inclined as a French version of The Bodyguard (1992), itself a muddled American pop culture homage to Kurosawa’s 1961 samurai classic Yojimbo, this odd genre mixture arrives with troubling political undertones hovering in the paranoid perimeter of a debatably deranged security guard’s watch of a wealthy Lebanese businessman’s family. Decidedly simplistic in form, it’s an elegantly crafted exercise enhanced by its particularly complex audio design, initially positioning its sullen protagonist as merely a madman approaching a breaking point. But more is revealed in the frequent display of observational skills, including a variety of non-verbal cues shared between its main characters through increasingly murky intrigue.

Recently returned from serving in Afghanistan, Vincent (Mathias Schoenaerts) suffers from night terrors and bouts of debilitating paranoia. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 30 – A Podcast About Podcasting

4 March 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark and Aaron are joined by Jd and Brendan from InSession Film Podcast to discuss the world of film podcasting. We talk about what led us to this new medium, how the community embraces and enhances it, and how much of an impact it has on our lives. We compare it to the terrestrial radio days, and marvel at how much more captivating “friends talking to each other” can be.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS or in iTunes

Episode Links & Notes

Special Guest: Jd Duran and Brendan Cassidy from InSession Film Podcast. You can find them on Twitter and Facebook.

0:00 – Intro & Welcome

2:10 – Jd and Brendan’s Criterion Connection

11:15 – Jd and Brendan on the recent Criterion releases

14:30 – Fat Girl recap

17:00 – Trust the West

19:00 – Podcasting Discussion

Episode Credits Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd | Amazon Wishlist Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

Next »

- Aaron West

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 29 – Fat Girl

23 February 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark, Aaron and Kristen Sales give Catherine Breillat’s Fat Girl a look. We look at Breillat’s methods, and the points about women in society she is trying to make. We delve into feminism, fat shaming, and the dichotomy between the lives of men and and women. We also take a close look at the shocking ending, and try to reconcile what she is trying to say about the world.

About the film:

Twelve-year-old Anaïs is fat. Her sister, fifteen-year-old Elena, is a beauty. While the girls are on vacation with their parents, Anaïs tags along as Elena explores the dreary seaside town. Elena meets Fernando, an Italian law student; he seduces her with promises of love, and the ever watchful Anaïs bears witness to the corruption of her sister’s innocence. Fat Girl is not only a portrayal of female adolescent sexuality and the complicated bond between siblings »

- Aaron West

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 28 – Slacker

19 February 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark and Aaron are joined by Cole & Ericca from the Magic Lantern Podcast. They are Austin, TX residents and shed a lot of insight into this landmark independent film, Richard Linklater and his involvement in the Austin Film Society. They also talk about how the film reflects the city of Austin, and how much the place has changed in the years since.

About the film:

Slacker, directed by Richard Linklater, presents a day in the life of a loose-knit Austin, Texas, subculture populated by eccentric and overeducated young people. Shooting on 16 mm for a mere $3,000, writer-producer-director Linklater and his crew of friends threw out any idea of a traditional plot, choosing instead to create a tapestry of over a hundred characters, each as compelling as the last. Slacker is a prescient look at an emerging generation of aggressive nonparticipants, and one of the key films of the American independent film movement of the 1990s. »

- Aaron West

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Criterion Close-Up 27 – Canadian Close-Up

5 February 2016 12:30 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark and Aaron take a trip north to the wonderful world of Canada. This is a special, unscheduled episode to celebrate the O’ Canada Blogathon. We talk about all things Canadian, including our Canadian Connections, film and media culture from Canada, and two particular films from The Criterion Collection — Videodrome and My Winnipeg.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS or in iTunes

Buy The Films On Amazon:

Episode Links & Notes

0:00 – Introduction to Canadian Close-Up

2:10 – Canadian Connections

9:30 – O’ Canada Blogathon

15:30 – Celebrating Canadian Culture

29:20 – Videodrome

50:10 – My Winnipeg

O’ Canada HQ Aaron’s review Episode Credits Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

Next time on the podcast: Fat Girl »

- Aaron West

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Criterion Close-Up – Episode 26 – Jellyfish Eyes

2 February 2016 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Mark and Aaron are joined by Matt Sheardown of … Criterion Close-Up. You heard right. Long story. Matt is also a video games expert, so we borrowed his expertise as we broke down and evaluated the controversial Criterion release of Takashi Murakami’s Jellyfish Eyes. We discuss the visuals, the influences, the intended audience, and how to classify it as a genre. We also ask the big question, which many have asked since the announcement — is it worthy of Criterion?

About the film:

The world-famous artist Takashi Murakami made his directorial debut with Jellyfish Eyes, taking his boundless imagination to the screen in a tale of friendship and loyalty that also addresses humanity’s propensity for destruction. After moving to a country town with his mother following his father’s death, a young boy befriends a charming, flying, jellyfish-like sprite—only to discover that his schoolmates have similar friends, and that »

- Aaron West

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

9 items from 2016


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