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Zvírátka a petrovstí (1946)

| Short, Family
The second cartoon by Jirí Trnka that was a sensation at the festival in Cannes in 1946 when it defeated the world animation elite of the time. It is a musical fairy-tale based on a famous ... See full summary »

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, (as S. Látal) | 2 more credits »
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The second cartoon by Jirí Trnka that was a sensation at the festival in Cannes in 1946 when it defeated the world animation elite of the time. It is a musical fairy-tale based on a famous folk story about animals that deterred thieves. The picture finished the monopoly of Disney's style in animation and it started an impetuous development of European animation. The picture is one of the best in the world of animation. Written by KrátkýFilm

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Short | Family

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Animais e os Bandoleiros  »

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Ballet Music
Music by Oskar Nedbal
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animal magnetism
10 October 2014 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

I noticed that I'm the first one reviewing Jiří Trnka's "Zvířátka a Petrovští" ("Animals and Robbers") on IMDb. Trnka's not the most famous director, so that's no surprise. But you should find out about him and watch his movies. This is only the second of his movies that I've seen. It's based on the Grimm brothers' "Town Musicians of Bremen", in which a couple of aging animals suspect that their owners will want to get rid of them, so they decide to move to Bremen to seek a new fortune. In the process, they foil the plans of some robbers.

Trnka's adaptation is a more flowery take on the story, with ballet music as the background sound. The cartoon got shown at the Cannes Film Festival right after its release in Czechoslovakia, proving to movie-goers that Eastern Europe could make impressive cartoons too. He used traditional animation as well as stop-motion. To this day, Trnka is known as the Walt Disney of Eastern Europe, and there's no doubt that he influenced Jan Švankmajer.

I saw the cartoon on YouTube. It has no subtitles, but the action makes the plot clear.


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