Water (2005) - News Poster

(I) (2005)

News

Nawazuddin Siddiqui champions the cause of water conservation

Nawazuddin Siddiqui champions the cause of water conservation
Nawazuddin Siddiqui has most definitely risen above his humble beginnings. Belonging to an agricultural background, the acclaimed actor has been recently approached by the Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation in order to spearhead a water conservation campaign. The talented actor who was a farmer before deciding to pursue his lifelong dreamRead More

The post Nawazuddin Siddiqui champions the cause of water conservation appeared first on Bollywood Hungama.
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Re-Thinking the Canon

Monsoon Wedding

My recent tweet storm about the need to re-think the (overwhelmingly white and male) canon led The Guardian to invite me to elaborate on my thoughts. They’ve used my piece as an introduction for a feature that asks writers, directors, producers, actresses, and other women in the industry to imagine a new, more inclusive canon.

The Guardian sourced contributions from women like Lynne Ramsay, Gurinder Chadha, and Amma Asante, whose respective picks are Claire Denis’ “Beau Travail,” Mira Nair’s “Monsoon Wedding,” and Barbra Steisand’s “Yentl.” This is what the canon looks like when women have a voice.

Head over to The Guardian to check out the feature. I’m really excited about how it turned out, but I’m even more excited by the reaction it’s causing. This was intended to be a conversation-starter, and people are talking. I’m receiving lots of tweets about what the canon could and should look like.

Here are some of the suggestions:

The Piano” — Directed by Jane Campion

Pariah” — Directed by Dee Rees

Born in Flames” — Directed by Lizzie Borden

Clueless” — Directed by Amy Heckerling

“Girlhood” — Directed by Céline Sciamma

“Eve’s Bayou” — Directed by Kasi Lemmons

“Raw” — Directed by Julia Ducournau

Middle of Nowhere” — Directed by Ava DuVernay

Black Girl” — Directed by Ousmane Sembene

Strange Days” — Directed by Kathryn Bigelow

The Elements trilogy (“Earth,” “Fire,” and “Water”) — Directed by Deepa Mehta

I’d love to hear from more people and to expand this important list. Please tweet me your picks @melsil. As more titles get added we’ll compile them and make a permanent home for this radical new canon, a celebration of the films that have been undervalued for far too long.

Re-Thinking the Canon was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Molly McGlynn — “Mary Goes Round”

Mary Goes Round

Molly McGlynn is a Canadian writer and director. Her previous short films include “I Am Not a Weird Person,” “Shoes,” and “3-Way (Not Calling).” “Mary Goes Round” is her first feature film. In 2015, she was selected as a Talent Lab Resident at the Reykjavik International Film Festival and as a Samsung Tiff Emerging Director.

Mary Goes Round” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 9.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Mm: “Mary Goes Round” is largely about overcoming alienation, both personal and familial, and the relief that comes with the acceptance. The film centers around a substance abuse counselor who returns to her childhood home after a DUI to meet her half-sister but learns that her estranged father is dying of cancer.

It’s about a woman who is forced to take care of a parent who she thinks let her down while simultaneously dealing with her personal demons for the sake of a teenage girl.

In the end, it’s about acts of love and taking care — not in the inane, vague email sign-off way but in a way that involves kindness and self-awareness. I wanted to unravel the sometimes circuitous way of viewing ourselves and assumptions about family relationships.

It sounds super heavy, but there’s a lot of humor and levity as well. Probably has something to do with Irish Catholic roots, but I find the darkest moments in are lives can also be the most morbidly funny as well.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Mm: It was one I needed to tell. I think there’s an old saying about making the film you need to before the one you should? It’s not autobiographical, but in many ways, I drew upon my experiences with self-identity and my relationship to my family. In making this film, I was able to create an alternate reality where I could creatively explore my deepest fears, regrets, and hopes that may or may not play out in real life.

Probably the most powerful moment on set for me was seeing a scene that was quite difficult for me to write emotionally and watching Aya Cash, who plays Mary, bring something that was totally hers to the performance. It is an amazing thing to see an actor take your words and transform them to something that belongs to them. There is comfort in how unoriginal the narratives of lives really are.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Mm: I want people to be moved and hopefully have laughed a bit, but maybe they will think about the parts of themselves or their history that they’ve avoided and what it would look like to confront those dark corners.

It ends on a beginning of sorts so I’d like the audience to think about beginnings. There is always time for a new one, I think.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Mm: I’d never made a feature before, so naturally it was overwhelming from a logistical and mental standpoint. The film had a very, very small budget — around a quarter of a million dollars — and the script called for about thirty locations and thirty speaking roles. With a team of absolute heroes behind me, we got it done.

Second to the logistical stuff, it can be overwhelming as a first-time director. I just kind of told myself I can do it and put one foot in front of the other until it was done. Fear is a powerful motivator but can really inhibit you once you’re in it.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Mm: Telefilm Canada has a Microbudget Programme supported by the Talent Fund that awards emerging filmmakers from certain accredited institutions — in my case, the Canadian Film Centre — with a grant to make their first feature. Additionally, we were supported by the Harold Greenberg Fund both in development and production. I also had additional investment from Wildling Pictures, the production company that produced the film. Yay, Canada!

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Mm: It was my absolute goal and dream to premiere here. About ten years ago, I started out as an intern before leaving to pursue my own work in a roundabout way, and there is no way I thought I’d be on this side of things. And here we are. Coincidentally, in my backyard.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Mm: Best advice: I went to a Film Fatales talk with Catherine Hardwicke last year and she said that whenever she does a big group scene, she writes out seating cards beforehand to save time. It’s a little thing that I think people can appreciate and keeps everyone moving. You easily alleviate cast and crew asking you multiple times where people are.

Worst advice: “It’s probably fine.” Whenever anyone says that, including myself, I have to take a second look. The devil is in the details.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Mm: I’m still learning, so I give the following advice to myself as well. Be a director in a way that makes sense to you. Drop the need to “perform” director. Everyone has shown up and is waiting for you to tell them what to do so find a way to make them want to do their best. For me, that means treating people with respect and apologizing when you’re wrong.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Mm: Gah! So many. Most recently, Maren Ade’s “Toni Erdmann.” It was so singularly bold, original, and no one could have done it but her. I don’t know if I would ever make a film like that, but I have so much respect for Ade and was moved deeply by it. Deepa Mehta’s “Water” and Jane Campion’s “The Piano” are two of the most beautifully directed movies I’ve ever seen. Last Tiff, I watched Houda Benyamina’s “Divines” and I thought it was so tender and impactful.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Mm: Personally, I have been given a huge amount of opportunity lately — largely from projects helmed by women — so I feel very optimistic. So much has been eloquently said on this matter, but I feel like the best thing I can do is just be the best director I can be so that other people don’t see hiring a woman as a risk. A good example is Ava DuVernay hiring all these women on her series “Queen Sugar” with the philosophy that she cannot be the sole change. It’s her job to help bring other women up with her. I think that is the most powerful and useful way to make real, meaningful change.

https://medium.com/media/f36d0b524b1112bd7abc0e8ca9fa0322/href

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Molly McGlynn — “Mary Goes Round” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Best Movie Trilogies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Movie Trilogies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Trip to Spain,” what is the best movie trilogy?

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Far be it from me to choose between Antonioni’s non-trilogy “L’Avventura,” “La Notte,” and “L’Eclisse” and Kiarostami’s explicitly-denied “Koker” trilogy of “Where Is the Friend’s Home?,” “Life and Nothing More,” and “Through the Olive Trees” (and I’m tempted to make a trilogy of trilogies with Carl Theodor Dreyer’s “Day of Wrath,” “Ordet,” and “Gertrud”), but if I put Kiarostami’s films first, it’s because he puts their very creation into the action. Reflexivity isn’t a
See full article at Indiewire »

Toronto International Film Fest Launches Share Her Journey Campaign

Share Her Story Ambassador Omoni Oboli: Red Carpet News TV/YouTube

This year’s edition of the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff) is still about two months away, but the fest is already introducing Share Her Journey, a program that will spotlight women in film from now until the end of Tiff 2017. Share Her Journey is the beginning of Tiff’s five-year plan to “grow its Talent Development programs with female-forward programming to increase participation, skills, and opportunities for women behind and in front of the camera,” a press release details.

This long-term commitment to gender diversity will include the introduction of gender equity initiatives, a three-month residency program, a producers’ accelerator program, speaker series, and “comprehensive resources” for educators on the topic of women’s representation in film. All of these offerings are designed to “champion diversity of gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and physical and cognitive ability.”

Tiff has also brought on women in the film industry to participate as Ambassadors for Share Her Journey events. Actress and “Okafor’s Law” director Omoni Oboli will serve as Ambassador as will shorts filmmaker and Tiff award-winner Carol Nguyen (“How Do You Pronounce Pho?”), “Manufactured Landscapes” director and documentarian Jennifer Baichwal, and Deepa Mehta, whose feminist drama “Water” received an Oscar nod for Best Foreign Language Film.

“Inclusion, accessibility, and diversity are central to our work at Tiff. We acknowledge that gender inequity is systemic in the screen industries, so change has to happen at every level. That includes getting more women into key creative roles,” stated Cameron Bailey, Tiff Artistic Director.

“We plan to seek out, develop, and showcase top female talent in the industry through our Festival and year-round initiatives,” Bailey continued. Our mission is to transform the way people see the world through film. One of the most powerful ways to do that is to foreground the perspectives of women.”

The past year has seen Canada leading the charge for gender equality in the film industry. Canada’s Women In the Director’s Chair (Widc) initiative launched an online directory of its filmmakers in May. The Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television introduced an apprenticeship program for female directors, and the National Film Board of Canada expanded its gender-equity plan by advocating for more women cinematographers, composers, and screenwriters in March.

In November Telefilm Canada, the country’s biggest film financier, introduced measures to ensure half of the movies it finances will now be directed or written by women. And the public broadcaster CBC announced last summer that at least half of the episodes of its popular scripted programs like “Murdoch Mysteries” and “Heartland” will be directed by women.

Fundraising for Share Her Journey begins tonight with a screening of Ida Lupino’s “Outrage,” which follows a young woman in the aftermath of an assault. For more information about the Share Her Journey campaign, go to Tiff’s website.

Tiff 2017 will take place September 7–17 in Toronto, Ontario.

Toronto International Film Fest Launches Share Her Journey Campaign was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Black Nights 2016 Review: Anatomy Of Violence, The Pain of a Terrible Crime

In 2012, a young medical student, Jyoti Singh, was gang-raped and brutally beaten by six men on a bus in New Delhi, later dying of her injuries. This sparked a nation-wide protest, with thousands calling on the government, and Indian society, to treat rape as the serious crime that it is. Indian-Canadian director Deepa Mehta, known for her more straightforward dramas and comedies (Bollywood/Hollywood, Water), takes a different direction in her experimental docudrama Anatomy of Violence, an imagined examination of the victim and perpetrators of the crime, their psychology and motivations.The film tells the story of the six rapists, telling each of their stories in moments from childhood and young adulthood, including the day of the crime. Interspersed is the story of the victim, renamed...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Lisa Ray’s Maxim cover: Defying the ‘age-blues’

Lisa Ray is one celebrity actor who needs to be quoted when it comes to the terms like ageless beauty, a fighter, an inspiration and the hottest diva ever. The Indo-Canadian actor made her Bollywood debut in 2001, with ‘Kasoor’ opposite Aftab Shivdasani. Although her acting career didn’t do much wonders for her but her ‘Style Diva’ image surely turns tables.

Repost from @maxim.india using @RepostRegramApp - Fantasizing about @lisaraniray is the perfect antidote to midweek blues. For more of her, pick up your copy of the November issue today. #AgeProofHotness #LisaRay #InBed #midweektreat #antidote #fantasy #MaximIndia #onstandsnow #sexysiren

A photo posted by lisaraniray (@lisaraniray) on Nov 15, 2016 at 2:36am Pst

When she was diagnosed with cancer in 2010, the fighter personality of hers, took charge of life. And, now when you see through the photos of her latest shoot for the cover of Maxim, you won’t get even
See full article at FilmiPop »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Anatomy of Violence’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Anatomy of Violence’
In late December 2012, 23-year-old medical student Jyoti Singh was beaten and gang-raped by six men aboard a moving bus in New Dehli, eventually succumbing from her injuries two days later. The incident shook the conscience of a nation, sparking widespread protests across India and a broader conversation about public safety and a culture that foments vicious misogyny. Last year, the acclaimed documentary “India’s Daughter” offered a comprehensive overview of the assault and its aftermath, and now Deepa Mehta’s semi-experimental feature “Anatomy of Violence” imagines scenes that weren’t part of the public record. Using improvisational techniques, Mehta dramatizes the backstories of the rapists and their victim, but 96 minutes isn’t nearly long enough to place the crime in a credible social context. Despite a heightened awareness of rape culture and its tragic consequences, her catastrophically misjudged film will struggle to add to the discussion.

Sacrificing the visual splendor of her Elements trilogy (“Fire,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Deepa Mehtas film on the Nirbhaya incident

Deepa Mehtas film on the Nirbhaya incident
Deepa Mehta came quietly to Delhi, shot her film Anatomy Of Violence on the gruesome gang rape in a moving bus in 2012 on the streets and went back to Toronto. The film is being premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this week. Deepa's take on the gruesome crime that shook our nation's conscience attempts to look at the crime from the other side. The film examines the antecedents of the rapists, their family life and their upbringing which engendered such brutality. Significantly the heinous crime is not shown on screen at all. The whole idea behind this tormenting take on the crime against humanity is to explore the psychology that results in such barbaric deeds. Anatomy Of Violence has been made almost entirely with theatre actors from Delhi in the cast. The only known face in the film is that of Seema Biswas who has been seen to brilliant
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Deepa Mehta's film on the Nirbhaya incident

Deepa Mehta's film on the Nirbhaya incident
<img class="aligncenter wp-image-655581 " src="http://www.bollywoodhungama.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Anatomy-Of-Violence.jpg" alt="Anatomy Of Violence" width="502" height="761" /> Deepa Mehta came quietly to Delhi, shot her film <i>Anatomy Of Violence</i> on the gruesome gang rape in a moving bus in 2012 on the streets and went back to Toronto. The film is being premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this week. Deepa's take on the gruesome crime that shook our nation's conscience attempts to look at the crime from the other side. The film examines the antecedents of the rapists, their family life and their upbringing which engendered such brutality. Significantly the heinous crime is not shown on screen at all. The whole idea behind this tormenting take on the crime against humanity is to explore the psychology that results in such barbaric deeds. <i>Anatomy Of Violence</i> has been made almost entirely with theatre actors from Delhi in the cast. The only known face in the film is that of Seema Biswas who has been seen to brilliant
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Deepa Mehta's film on the Nirbhaya incident

Deepa Mehta's film on the Nirbhaya incident
<img class="aligncenter wp-image-655581 " src="http://www.bollywoodhungama.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Anatomy-Of-Violence.jpg" alt="Anatomy Of Violence" width="502" height="761" /> Deepa Mehta came quietly to Delhi, shot her film <i>Anatomy Of Violence</i> on the gruesome gang rape in a moving bus in 2012 on the streets and went back to Toronto. The film is being premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this week. Deepa's take on the gruesome crime that shook our nation's conscience attempts to look at the crime from the other side. The film examines the antecedents of the rapists, their family life and their upbringing which engendered such brutality. Significantly the heinous crime is not shown on screen at all. The whole idea behind this tormenting take on the crime against humanity is to explore the psychology that results in such barbaric deeds. <i>Anatomy Of Violence</i> has been made almost entirely with theatre actors from Delhi in the cast. The only known face in the film is that of Seema Biswas who has been seen to brilliant
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Tiff 2016. Lineup

  • MUBI
A selection of films from the 2016 edition of the Toronto International Film Festival has been unveiled, with films by Jim Jarmusch, Maren Ade, Tom Ford, Paul Verhoeven, Damien Chazelle, and many more.Opening NIGHTThe Magnificent Seven (Antoine Fuqua)GALASDeepwater HorizonArrival (Denis Villeneuve)Deepwater Horizon (Peter Berg)The Headhunter's Calling (Mark Williams)The Journey Is the Destination (Bronwen Hughes)Jt + The Tennessee Kids (Jonathan Demme)Lbj (Rob Reiner)Lion (Garth Davis)Loving (Jeff Nichols)A Monster Calls (J.A. Bayona)Planetarium (Rebecca Zlotowski)Queen of Katwe (Mira Nair)The Rolling Stones of Olé Olé Olé!: A Trip Across Latin America (Paul Dugdale)The Secret Scripture (Jim Sheridan)Snowden (Oliver Stone)Strange Weather (Katherine Dieckmann)Their Finest (Lone Scherfig)A United Kingdom (Amma Astante)Special PRESENTATIONSLa La LandThe Age of Shadows (Kim Jee-woon)All I See Is You (Marc Forster)American Honey (Andrea Arnold)American Pastoral (Ewan McGregor)Asura: The City of
See full article at MUBI »

Tiff Rounds Out Slate With ‘Blair Witch,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Bad Batch’ and Many More

Tiff Rounds Out Slate With ‘Blair Witch,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Bad Batch’ and Many More
The Toronto International Film Festival has nearly completed its slate announcement this year — expect a few stragglers to be announced in the coming days, but this is about the size of it — rounding out its lineup with today’s announcement of its Docs, Midnight Madness, Vanguard and Tiff Cinematheque picks. And what a group this is, including plenty of returning favorites and some very exciting new names.

Tiff’s Docs section features a collection of works from award-winning directors including Steve James, Raoul Peck, Errol Morris and Werner Herzog. Leonardo DiCaprio even pops up for a “rousing call to action on climate change” in “The Turning Point,” made in collaboration with Academy Award winner Fisher Stevens and already picked up by National Geographic.

Read More: Tiff Reveals First Slate of 2016 Titles, Including ‘Magnificent Seven,’ ‘American Honey,’ ‘La La Land’ and ‘Birth of A Nation’

The beloved Midnight Madness section offers
See full article at Indiewire »

Toronto Film Fest Canadian Lineup Includes Xavier Dolan, Kim Nguyen, Deepa Mehta

The Toronto Film Festival has revealed the lineup of titles that will make up its Canadian offerings next month. Running the gamut from documentaries to dramas, biographies, thrillers and animation, the roster includes veteran filmmakers and emerging talent. Among the world premieres are docs The River Of My Dreams from Oscar winner Brigitte Berman, and Anatomy Of Violence by Oscar-nominated Water helmer Deepa Mehta. North American premieres include Xavier Dolan’s Cannes…
See full article at Deadline »

Sundance: Sandy Hook Documentary ‘Newtown’ Unites 17 Composers for Emotional Score

Sundance: Sandy Hook Documentary ‘Newtown’ Unites 17 Composers for Emotional Score
Newtown,” which debuts this weekend at Sundance, has what may be the most ambitious score of any movie in the festival: 17 different composers contributed music, all because they were moved by the subject matter.

Newtown” deals with the aftermath of the December 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, where 20 first-graders and six staffers were killed in the second-deadliest mass shooting by a gunman in U.S. history.

Composer Fil Eisler (“Revenge,” “Empire”), Czech-born but now an American citizen with a 4-year-old daughter, remembers a conversation with producer Maria Cuomo Cole in which he expressed his outrage at yet another massacre. (“I’m scared of her growing up in this country,” he said.) Then Cole told him she was working on a film about Sandy Hook.

“The floor just fell out from under me,” Eisler recalls. “I didn’t ever want to see that film, much less score it.” But the more he thought about it,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bouzid, Soliman win top prizes at Diff

  • ScreenDaily
Leyla Bouzid’s As I Open My Eyes won best fiction film in the Muhr Feature competition at this year’s Dubai International Film Festival (Diff), while Mahmood Soliman’s We Have Never Been Kids scooped best non-fiction film and best director.

Bouzid’s Tunis-set drama tells the story of a young woman singing in a political rock band in the run-up to the Tunisian revolution. Soliman’s documentary is about an Egyptian woman trying to look after her four children around the time of her divorce.

Salem Brahimi’s Let Them Come, about a family affected by a rising tide of Islamic fundamentalism in 1990s Algeria, scooped the Special Jury Prize in the Muhr Feature competition.

Best actress went to Menna Shalabi for her performance in Egyptian filmmaker Hala Khalil’s Nawara, while best actor went to Lotfi Abdelli for Tunisian director Fares Naanaa’s Borders Of Heaven.

“We have been so impressed with the female
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Toronto Film Critics to honour Deepa Mehta

  • ScreenDaily
Toronto Film Critics to honour Deepa Mehta
The Toronto Film Critics Association has selected the director of Water to receive its Technicolor Clyde Gilmour Award.

Mehta will endow $50,000 in services to a filmmaker of her choosing and is expected to announce her designate in the days to come.

“Being chosen by the Toronto Film Critics for the Technicolor Clyde Gilmour Award is gratifying, unexpected, and genuinely touching,” said Mehta. “It’s a great feeling.

“The relationship between artists and critics can certainly be fractious, but in a strange way we are inextricably connected – we all have a passion for movies (well not all movies) and value it when they make a contribution to increasing our understanding of each other and reveal the foibles of human existence.

“I admit that I am sometimes strongly opposed to the views expressed by some critics and perhaps am too vocal at times about my disagreements. This makes this award even more precious to me.

“I wanted
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Room', 'The Big Short' to bookend Dubai fest

'Room', 'The Big Short' to bookend Dubai fest
Spotlight, Truth and Concussion are also among the festival’s programme.

Lenny Abrahamson’s Oscar-contender Room will open the 12th Dubai International Film Festival (Diff) this year, which will run December 9-16.

The film, an adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s novel, tells the story of a young mother and her 5-year-old son who are held captive in a small room. Lead actress Brie Larson has already received nominations at the Gotham Awards and yesterday’s Independent Spirits for her performance, and is a favourite for the Academy Awards next year.

The festival will be closed by Adam McKay’s The Big Short, which has an ensemble cast featuring Ryan Gosling, Steve Carell, Christian Bale and Brad Pitt, and recently premiered at Los Angeles’ AFI Fest (Nov 5-12).

Other films screening include: Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight; James Vanderbilt’s Truth; Peter Landesman’s Concussion; Nicholas Hytner’s The Lady In The Van; and Hany Abu-Assad’s The Idol
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch: 'Beeba Boys' Send A Deadly (Text) Message in Exclusive Clip

Watch: 'Beeba Boys' Send A Deadly (Text) Message in Exclusive Clip
Read More: Watch: Drug Lords Are Out For Blood in Exclusive '4GOT10' Clip The latest film from Oscar-nominated director Deepa Mehta is "Beeba Boys," an adrenaline-filled gangster epic cut with a Bollywood flair. The film tracks the eponymous gang -- a syndicate of stylish Indo-Canadians -- staking their claim in the Vancouver criminal underworld. In the exclusive clip above, the Beeba Boys interrupt a presumed rival's celebrations with an ominous text message. Suffice it to say, your celebration would probably be ruined if you learned "U R about to be gunned down." After earning critical acclaim for "Water," the female director Mehta is changing pace with "Beeba Boys," looking to subvert the macho genre by bringing it to uncharted territory. From the intense trailer, one gets the sense that Mehta looks to similar gangster auteurs such as Scorsese and Tarantino but tries to break new ground by injecting
See full article at Indiewire »

BFI London Film Festival Review: Deepa Mehta’s Indo-Canadian Gangster Epic ‘Beeba Boys’

It’s consistently one of cinema’s most popular genres (at least among a certain demographic), and has been since the 1930s, but the gangster picture also often risks retreading the same old ground over and over again. Look at “Black Mass,” which looks nice, has a stellar cast, is even based on a true story, and yet still ends up feeling like warmed up leftovers, in part because its material has been so well cannibalized by others, and in part because it has absolutely nothing new to say. So the great Indian/Canadian filmmaker Deepa Mehta has an advantage with her own foray into the familiar genre. The filmmaker, best known for her ‘Elements’ trilogy (1996’s “Fire,” 1998’s “Earth,” and 2005’s Oscar-nominated “Water”) isn’t associated with movies involving bloody violence or quippy, profane dialogue, but her latest, “Beeba Boys” has both, telling an expansive crime tale about feuding Sikh gangsters in Vancouver.
See full article at The Playlist »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites