7.5/10
11
2 user

The Lollipop Cover (1965)

An ex-boxer meets a 9-year-old abandoned girl and together they hitchhike to California, where he must find a junkie who owes him money.

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1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Nick Bartaloni
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Felicity (as Carol Seflinger)
George Sawaya ...
The Fighter
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Landlady
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Waitress
Midge Ware ...
Nancy
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Richard
Cliff Carnell ...
Man on Beach
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George
Carolyn Hughes ...
Rosie
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Salesman
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Nestor
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Singer
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Storyline

An ex-boxer meets a 9-year-old abandoned girl and together they hitchhike to California, where he must find a junkie who owes him money.

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Drama

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Release Date:

November 1965 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

When I See a Rainbow
words and music by Ruby Raksin and James D. Mitchell
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User Reviews

 
Sweet but not sugary
9 January 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Boxer Nick (Don Gordon, "Bullitt") sets off on a trek across California to find a man who owes him money, and along the way he happens upon a young Felicity (Carol Anne Seflinger, "Wonderbug"), who attaches herself to him like a barnacle. Although initially disenchanted with her, Nick is instinctively protective of the girl and genuinely comes to care for her.

I understand why this film's completely obscure - there's a whole lot of nothing going on in the story, which plods along at a snail's pace. However, there's some pithy dialogue, wonderful performances, beautiful locales and an underlying grit that's unusual for a film from 1965 - Felicity's father's a raging alcoholic, Nick's sister ran off with a heroin addict, and the duo crosses paths with a predatory gay guy and a promiscuous waitress. In another film, these elements could seem wildly exploitative, but they're generally handled with dignity here, preventing the movie from devolving into trashiness or the stereotypical sort of Disney fare that it could have been. In other words, it's sweet without being overly sugary.

If you're a fan of any of the actors, it's worth tracking down for their performances, though most of them have limited screen time and Sally Kellerman doesn't appear at all (honestly, I don't recall even hearing the song that she's credited for singing). It's certainly not the greatest movie ever made, but it feels like it was a labor of love for the small cast and crew.


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