It's more fun than a barrel of monkeys. Regular village "cut-ups" are those actor chaps and actresses. They don't keep still a minute when they get loose on the village green at the Polo ... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
George Bickel
Emma Carus ...
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Joe Humphries ...
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Terry McGovern ...
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Annie Oakley ...
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Billie Reeves
Tim Sullivan ...
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Storyline

It's more fun than a barrel of monkeys. Regular village "cut-ups" are those actor chaps and actresses. They don't keep still a minute when they get loose on the village green at the Polo Grounds. The band begins to play and the procession starts from Madison Square in "buzz wagons" and keeps moving until they get to the grounds where every actress, actor and actorman in town passes in review before the grandstand of political and social celebrities there assembled. Here they come now: Eddie Foy, Bert Williams, Marie Dressler, Lew Fields, Marshall P. Wilder. George M. Cohan, Victor Moore. Jim Corbett, Tim Sullivan, Joe Humphreys, Emma Carus, Louis Mann, Terry McGovern, Annie Oakley, Irene Franklin and, well, just watch them as they pass by and you can pick them all out. This show takes in every show in Manhattan and the suburbs. There goes the wild men of Borneo in a Salome war dance. The phonie band is a close second. You can't hear them play any music because they don't. Annie Oakley... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Release Date:

11 October 1910 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with Brother Man (1910). See more »

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I Love a Parade! (But where's Marie?)
26 May 2015 | by (Westchester County, NY) – See all my reviews

This brief actuality film, made by the Brooklyn-based Vitagraph Company, records a carnival-style fund-raiser at the old Polo Grounds in New York. Staged on August 19, 1910, the event was organized to generate money for the Actors' Fund, a cause that was particularly important in the era before the formation of Actors' Equity, the organization which since 1919 has struggled to improve working conditions for performers.

The footage in this short begins with a parade around the stadium. There's a marching band, schoolgirls in uniform, and a lady in a big hat waving an American flag. We see a lot of performers in flamboyant outfits, such as a man dressed as a dog, a stage Irishman, Scots in kilts, Zulu warriors, and several Napoleons. A number of popular stage stars of the day participated in the festivities. Most of these players are long forgotten today, and unfortunately the title cards do not identify any of them. There's a promising moment when three men approach, carrying a banner reading MARIE DRESSLER, but Miss Dressler, who was certainly one of the most distinctive looking stars of her era, is nowhere to be seen. We do get a brief look at Harry Watson Jr., better known as "Musty Suffer," who performs a brief clown routine with his partner, George Bickel. A lady said to be Annie Oakley takes shots at several targets, but she's filmed in such a way that we can't evaluate her marksmanship. We also get a quick glimpse of the legendary comedian Bert Williams, who spars in a comic boxing match with another actor, possibly Eddie Foy. Beyond that, most of the running time is devoted to familiar carnival events, such as a foot race, a pie-eating contest, a greased pig chase, etc.

Needless to say, the entertainment value of this newsreel-like snippet will be limited to viewers interested in the popular culture of the ragtime era. I found it fairly interesting, but I do wish we could have seen more of Mr. Williams, and I also wish that posterity might have granted us at least a peak at Miss Dressler. Something tells me she did in fact appear before the cameras on that summer day back in 1910, but the footage does not survive. How could she NOT have posed for the cameras? Shyness was never a problem for Marie!


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