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Queen of the Damned (2002)

The vampire Lestat becomes a rock star whose music wakes up the queen of all vampires.

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(novels), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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3,806 ( 290)

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ON DISC
7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Christian Manon ...
Mael
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Khayman
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Tiriel Mora ...
Megan Cooper ...
Maudy (as Megan Dorman)
Johnathan Devoy ...
James
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Alex
Conrad Standish ...
T. C.
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Storyline

After many years of sleeping in his coffin, the vampire Lestat awakens only to find that the world has changed and he wants to be a part of it. He gathers a following and becomes a rock star only to find that his music awakens the ancient Queen Akasha and she wants him to become her king... Written by Andrew Main

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This time there are no interviews. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Horror

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for vampire violence | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

22 February 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Anne Rice's Queen of the Damned  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The architecture of Aunt Maharet's house is based upon Angkor Wat, the stone temple located in Siem Reap, Cambodia. See more »

Goofs

Shadow of the wire-cam visible on the front-drop of the stage (right of screen) during the overhead zoom into Lestat during the concert. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lestat: [voiceover] There comes a time for every vampire when the idea of eternity becomes momentarily unbearable. Living in the shadows, feeding in the darkness with only your own company to keep, rots into a solitary, hollow existence. Immortality seems like a good idea, until you realize you're going to spend it alone. So I went to sleep, hoping that the sounds of the passing eras would fade out, and a sort of death might happen. But as I lay there, the world didn't sound like the place ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Dedicated to Aaliyah Dana Haughton 1979 - 2001 See more »

Connections

References The Wizard of Oz (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

Slept So Long
Written and Produced by Jonathan Davis and Richard Gibbs
Performed by Jonathan Davis
Double Violin and Vocal Improvisation by Shenkar
Jonathan Davis appears courtesy of Epic Records
Shankar appears courtesy of 15 Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Wow, what a massive step down from Interview With The Vampire.
20 May 2012 | by See all my reviews

Interview With The Vampire dealt with the anguish that goes hand in hand with becoming a vamp. In contrast, Queen Of The Damned panders to that goth/emo fantasy where it is really cool to be an immortal bloodsucker, likening it to the life of a rock star with millions of adoring fans. This approach mightn't be all that bad, if only Queen Of The Damned didn't do it all in such a lame and predictable manner.

Stuart Townsend takes over the character of Lestat from Tom Cruise and delivers a weak central performance lacking the star power and charisma vital for the role; his pale boyish looks would certainly not earn him the respect of hardcore nu-metal fans. As ineffectual as Townsend's turn as Lestat is, however, it is nowhere near the worst thing about the film: the pacing is dreadfully slow, the dialogue is dreary, the direction lacks the sumptuous detail and elegance that Neil Jordan gave Interview, and the less said about Aaliyah's awful performance as Akasha the better (suffice to say that even the way she walked annoyed the hell out of me).


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