8.2/10
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6 user 1 critic

Killing Priscilla (2000)

| Documentary | Video
Documentary about director Stephan Elliott's career after making award winning, fan favourite and festival darling- Priscilla Queen Of The Desert. The film touches on Welcome To Woop Woop, ... See full summary »

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Stephan Elliott ...
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Joe Simon ...
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Documentary about director Stephan Elliott's career after making award winning, fan favourite and festival darling- Priscilla Queen Of The Desert. The film touches on Welcome To Woop Woop, but mostly focuses on the making of his second follow up, Eye Of The Beholder. Directed by Elliott's friend and collaborator, Lizzie Gardiner, you get an intimate and what feels like a very uncensored look at making a film after great success(Priscilla...) and failure( Welcome...). Gardiner who won an Oscar for costume design for Priscilla Queen Of The Desert and is perhaps more recognisable for having worn a gold American Express dress to the Awards show - manages to infuse humour and sweetness to an otherwise soul crushing process. Worth watching, if only to see some of the behind the scenes antics of a director and his stars (Ashley Judd and Ewan McGregor). Written by Layladivine

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References Eye of the Beholder (1999) See more »

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mildly interesting
19 March 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Very straightforward documentary unfolds the making of a bomb. I haven't seen Eye of the Beholder, it seems some people just loved it but even they find it difficult. So whether it is an uncompromising artistic vision or self-indulgent drivel is something I look forward to discovering on my own.

A number of comments here suggest the movie was destroyed by the suits, but it doesn't really look that way to me. Yes, the suits wanted changes and additions and made the director re-shoot some stuff, but it did not look like (from what is seen in the documentary) that they wanted huge changes; they just wanted it sexier to be more commercial. So when the test audience loathed the film, it was probably loathing more-or-less Stephan's vision.

I think it is also important to note that Stephan made it perfectly clear in the documentary that he had basically conned his backers. He told them he was making a commercial thriller when he was planning to do nothing of the kind. If you promise something specific to someone in exchange for money and then deliver something else, you have to expect them to want you to change it to what they were expecting. So it was a calculated risk; get the money, make the movie he wanted and hope it succeeded. One of the most interesting parts of the movie is seeing how nervous Stephan is as the time comes near when he's going to show the film to his backers with every expectation that they are in for a shock.

The movie is mildly interesting throughout but only really interesting in the last part as things increasingly fall apart. I doubt anyone not interested in the film industry would find it especially interesting.


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