6.1/10
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10 user 3 critic

Echoes of Enlightenment (2001)

Echos of Enlightenment (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi | August 2001 (Greece)
A fascinating story about a sleazy lawyer who stumbles upon enlightenment.

Director:

(as Daniel J. Coplan)

Writer:

(as Daniel J. Coplan)
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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Mary Gesar
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Marie (as Shannah Laumeister)
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Paul
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Joe (as Gordon Noice)
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Rabbi Don Carlos White Wolf
Tom Seiler ...
Mary's Dad
Giovanna Brokaw ...
Jigonsashe
Marvin Bang ...
Gangbanger
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LAPD Detective
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Court Clerk
Aimée Jeanne Bourgon ...
Boyfriend Problems Client (as Aimee Bourgon)
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Herb Kleinberg
Fredrick Burton ...
Attorney from Ventura (as Fred Burton)
N. Barry Carver ...
LA Times Reporter
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Cast 'n' Cane Dude
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Storyline

Everyday, somewhere in America, a middle aged man leaves his home, his family, and never returns. Daniel, who knows the meaning of dreams and visions, is one such man. 60 days after Daniel disappears, his wife Mary, is determined to find him. She retraces his path, meets all the people he touched before he vanished, and makes a startling discovery. The answer to what happened to Daniel is resolved in a remarkable life affirming ending. Written by Dan Coplan

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Daniel had a good soul, he was a husband, and an attorney. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Mystery | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Release Date:

August 2001 (Greece)  »

Also Known As:

Echoes of Enlightenment  »

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User Reviews

 
I liked it!
30 April 2005 | by See all my reviews

"Echos of Enlightenment" Dan Coplan's indie is a great study of humanity in the 21st century. The character Dan is, whether or not we admit it, can be found in all of us. He is a man coping in the 21st century with all the stresses of outside influences hammering away at anything good he has, or is about, when he disappears. This movie is an excellent metaphor for the Buddhist principle of the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds and shows that happiness is possible under any circumstance. It's all up to the individual. The characters journey from Hell to Buddhahood is depicted with seriousness and humor. A great movie for anyone open to the possibilities of innate happiness.


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