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Prozac Nation (2001)

A young woman struggles with depression during her first year at Harvard.

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(based on the book by), (adaptation) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Rafe
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Noah (as Jonathan Rhys-Meyers)
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Sam
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Donald (as Nick Campbell)
Zoe Miller ...
Elizabeth at 12
Sheila Paterson ...
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Mister Cool
Nicole Parker ...
Waitress (as Nicole Parker Smith)
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Julia
Klodyne Rodney ...
Nurse
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Rolling Stone Editor
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Storyline

A young woman struggles with depression during her first year at Harvard.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Young and depressed in America See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, drug content, sexuality/nudity and some disturbing images | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

13 June 2003 (Portugal)  »

Also Known As:

A Prozac népe  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Elizabeth Wurtzel is writing the piece on Bruce Springsteen, a pack of Morleys, the fictional cigarette brand from the The X-Files (1993) and many other movies and TV shows can be seen on her desk. See more »

Goofs

When Lizzie's Dad takes a photo, camera is in horizontal position. When Lizzie finds the photo, it seems like it was taken by vertically-oriented camera. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Sterling: Have you had any drugs in the last 24 hours?
Elizabeth: No. Well... I guess I snorted some coke and smoked some pot but uh, you know, that was just to make the ecstasy last longer.
Dr. Sterling: Sure you're not forgetting anything?
Elizabeth: Maybe a few beers?
Dr. Sterling: Did you ever think you might have a substance abuse problem?
Elizabeth: The only substance problem I have right now is that I need you to get me some trank so I can come down off this fucking coke.
Dr. Sterling: And then what happens?
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Crazy Credits

During the opening credits, the close-up shots of the letters Elizabeth is typing form the sentence, "I hate myself and I want to die." See more »

Connections

References It's a Wonderful Life (1946) See more »

Soundtracks

Perfect Day
Written and Performed by Lou Reed
Used by permission of Screen Gems - EMI Music Inc.
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User Reviews

Worth Watching
3 October 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I believe Erik Skjoldbjærg holds the record for most 'J's in a director's name, but apart from that, he also shows good restraint and a keen eye for narrative and detail in helming 'Prozac Nation.' Basically a period piece set in the mid 80's, the film relates the collegiate memoirs of Elizabeth Wurtzel, who now writes a music column for The New Yorker. Christina Ricci plays the part of Wurtzel and does passably well, though I couldn't help noticing the actual Wurtzel bears more than a slight resemblance to Anne Hathaway.

The film gives a sympathetic account of Wurztel's struggles with substance abuse and depression while being a journalism prodigy and dealing with undergraduate studies at Harvard. Friends and family run out of patience in trying to secure help for her as she tailspins into a suicidal funk. Eventually, she allows herself to be medicated on Prozac, which sort of stands as the anticlimactic resolution of the film.

Jason Biggs does a fine job portraying her first serious lover, and they have a couple very powerful scenes together which I would recommend that people watch if they are at all concerned about heir own tendencies to romantically obsess over other people. Jessica Lange falls a bit into melodrama in portraying Wurtzel's frazzled mother, but Michelle WIlliams gives a very strong performance as Wurtzel's supportive but overwhelmed roommate. Anne Heche turns in a *meh* performance as Wurtzels's shrink. Lou Reed plays himself and in one incredibly frightening scene he gently strokes Ricci's face (don't get too alarmed, it happens in a fantasy sequence).

I find it sort of sadly hilarious that this film, which appositionally refers to America in its title never received a U.S. theatrical run. Americans should probably all watch this movie.


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