6.3/10
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117 user 44 critic

Prozac Nation (2001)

A young woman struggles with depression during her first year at Harvard.

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(based on the book by), (adaptation) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Rafe
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Noah (as Jonathan Rhys-Meyers)
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Sam
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Donald (as Nick Campbell)
Zoe Miller ...
Elizabeth at 12
Sheila Paterson ...
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Mister Cool
Nicole Parker ...
Waitress (as Nicole Parker Smith)
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Julia
Klodyne Rodney ...
Nurse
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Rolling Stone Editor
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Storyline

Elizabeth "Lizzie" Wurtzel is a teenager accepted into Harvard with a scholarship in journalism. She has been raised by her divorced mother Mrs. Wurtzel since she was two years old, but she misses her father and feels needy and depressive. When she joins the university, she lives with a roommate Ruby and has her sexual initiation with Noah. Her article for the local column in Crimson newspaper is awarded by Rolling Stone magazine. Lizzie becomes abusive in sex and drugs, and her existential crisis and depression increases and she hurts her friends and her mother that love her, while dating Rafe. Mrs. Wurtzel sends her to an expensive psychiatric treatment with Dr. Sterling, in spite of having difficulties paying for her medical bills and therapy sessions. After a long period of treatment under medication, and suicide attempt, Lizzie stabilizes and adjusts to the real world. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Pledge allegiance. Life's a drag. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, drug content, sexuality/nudity and some disturbing images | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

13 June 2003 (Portugal)  »

Also Known As:

Geração Prozac  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)
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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Elizabeth Wurtzel is writing the piece on Bruce Springsteen, a pack of Morleys, the fictional cigarette brand from the The X-Files (1993) and many other movies and TV shows can be seen on her desk. See more »

Goofs

Elizabeth has a Bruce Springsteen "Tunnel of Love" album poster hanging in her room in 1985. The album was not released until 1987. See more »

Quotes

Elizabeth: Ever since I was a little kid, my mum and I hang out together. I didn't fit in with most kids at schools. They thought I was strange, so they made me feel like a stranger. And my mother took advantage of it from an early age, throwing me into plays, spelling bees, studying, writing, museums, concerts, and even more writing. She convinced me this would lead to the Holy Grail: Harvard. A place where I would finally be surrounded by people I had something in common with.
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Connections

References The Last Waltz (1978) See more »

Soundtracks

Sweet Jane
Written and Performed by Lou Reed
Used by permission of Screen Gems - EMI Music Inc.
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User Reviews

A girl suffers from debilitating depression at Harvard.
8 February 2004 | by See all my reviews

I thought that the main problem with Prozac Nation was that it just seemed to lack focus. The movie obviously compressed a lot of details in the book, but I think if it had just focused on the main crisis of the book, the character's descent into depression would have been easier to understand and empathize. As it was, it tried to do that, but it also tried to cram in other things, and I feel that if I hadn't read the book or gone through something similar myself, I would not have understood why Lizzie was so afflicted at this particular point in her life.

I thought the acting was excellent: Michelle Williams and Jason Biggs were great, and Christina Ricci was phenomenal, capturing the entire range of the pain and anger and self-loathing of depression. I thought Jessica Lange put in a good performance, although her bizarre accent and the fact that she in no way resembles the darker and petite Christina Ricci was really distracting. I was simply unable to believe she was her mother, and certainly not a Jewish mother.

If you're a fan of one or more of the actors, I would watch the movie for the sake of appreciating their skill. Or, if you've suffered from severe depression, then watch it and know that there are other people who feel the same way you do and think the same thoughts as you, and who would understand why you feel and act the way you do. Otherwise, skip it. If you don't understand depression before going into the film, it is unlikely that this it will shed any light on the topic for you. It's pretty much impossible to understand unless you've been there yourself.


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