IMDb > "Agatha Christie's Poirot" The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (2000)

"Agatha Christie's Poirot" The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (2000)

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Agatha Christie (novel)
Clive Exton (dramatized by)
View company contact information for The Murder of Roger Ackroyd on IMDbPro.
Original Air Date:
2 January 2000 (Season 7, Episode 1)
Poirot comes out of retirement when his industrialist friend is brutally murdered a short while after a local widow who was suspected of killing her husband commits suicide. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Untrusted Narrator See more (18 total) »


 (Episode Cast) (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

David Suchet ... Hercule Poirot

Philip Jackson ... Chief Inspector Japp

Oliver Ford Davies ... Dr. Sheppard
Malcolm Terris ... Roger Ackroyd
Selina Cadell ... Caroline Sheppard
Daisy Beaumont ... Ursula Bourne

Flora Montgomery ... Flora Ackroyd
Nigel Cooke ... Geoffrey Raymond

Jamie Bamber ... Ralph Paton
Roger Frost ... Parker
Vivien Heilbron ... Mrs. Ackroyd

Gregor Truter ... Inspector Davis
Rosalind Bailey ... Mrs. Ferrars
Liz Kettle ... Mrs. Folliott
Charles Simon ... Hammond
Charles Early ... Constable Jones
Graham Chinn ... Landlord

Clive Brunt ... Naval Officer
Alice Hart ... Mary
Philip Wrigley ... Postman
Phil Atkinson ... Ted
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Tony Red Richards ... Villager (uncredited)

Episode Crew
Directed by
Andrew Grieve 
Writing credits
Agatha Christie (novel)

Clive Exton (dramatized by)

Produced by
Brian Eastman .... producer
Delia Fine .... executive producer: for A&E Television Networks
Peter Hider .... associate producer
Kris Slava .... supervising producer: for A&E Television Networks
Original Music by
Christopher Gunning 
Cinematography by
Chris O'Dell (director of photography)
Film Editing by
Frank Webb 
Casting by
Anne Henderson 
Production Design by
Rob Harris 
Art Direction by
Katie Driscoll  (as Katie Buckley)
Costume Design by
Charlotte Holdich 
Makeup Department
Sarah Grundy .... makeup artist
Kate Hodgson .... makeup artist
Pam Meager .... make-up
Production Management
Nick Girvan .... unit manager (uncredited)
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
David MacDonald .... first assistant (as David Macdonald)
Marios Hamboulides .... assistant director (uncredited)
Chris Hider .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Nathaniel McCullagh .... daily assistant director (uncredited)
Nathaniel McCullagh .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Daniel Toland .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Art Department
Dave Channon .... construction
Tina Jones .... set dresser
Katie Lee .... buyer
Mickey Lennon .... property master (as Micky Lennon)
Garry Dawson .... stand by props (uncredited)
Sound Department
Sandy MacRae .... sound recordist
Sarah Morton .... sound editing
Mike Reardon .... boom operator
Ian Tapp .... dubbing mixer
Oliver Tarney .... sound editing
Ian Tapp .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Joss Gower .... stunt double (uncredited)
Richard Hammatt .... stunts (uncredited)
Jason White .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Vince Goddard .... gaffer
Ricky Hall .... grip
Jamie Harcourt .... camera operator
David Hedges .... focus puller (as Dave Hedges)
Martin Cox .... electrician (uncredited)
Martin Gooch .... camera trainee (uncredited)
Lorraine Luke .... camera loader (uncredited)
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Lezli Everitt .... wardrobe
Steven Kirkby .... wardrobe
Editorial Department
Bruce Everett .... post-production
Tony Tromp .... assistant editor
Cherry Brewer .... post-production coordinator (uncredited)
Justin Eely .... on-line editor (uncredited)
Other crew
Jeffrey Broom .... accounts
Joel Holmes .... locations
Suzanne McGeachan .... script supervisor (as Suzanne Clegg)
Dawn Mortimer .... co-ordinator
Michael Morton .... with the co-operation of the estate of
Jeffrey Bruce .... accountant (uncredited)
Pauline Hume .... title designer (uncredited)
Jen Lambert .... unit nurse (uncredited)
Tracey Nicholls .... secretary (uncredited)

Series Crew
These people are regular crew members. Were they in this episode?
Sound Department
Lionel Strutt .... adr mixer
Other crew
Mark Albela .... location manager
Daren Thomas .... location runner
Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

103 min | UK:100 min (14 episodes)
Australia:M | Finland:K-11 (DVD) (2007) | UK:12 (video rating) (2000)

Did You Know?

Continuity: In the scene where Ackroyd's butler, Parker, is drunk and staggering down the road, the car behind him stops. Visible for a brief instant is the car's license plate, COU 313. In the very next scene as the car begins its run, the license plate has changed to JHX 473.See more »
Hercule Poirot:When one retires, one hurls oneself into new pursuits.See more »
Movie Connections:
Version of Alibi (1931)See more »


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22 out of 26 people found the following review useful.
Untrusted Narrator, 18 January 2005
Author: tedg ( from Virginia Beach

The book on which this is based is one of the cleverest in all literature. The detective story is a matter of intellectual battle between the reader and the writer for control over the larger arc of the story. In most cases, the writer's avatar is the narrator. But what if the narrator is a character in the story and caught up in motivations from the fictional world?

It is a fantastic idea, that of the untrusted narrator. And it is one that clever writers and filmmakers have been using for a long time. Kubrick was one over on the film side and still after all those viewings most people take him literally. Just goes to show that it is very hard to do one of these untrusted narrator things in film. And it is nearly impossible if you have to aim as low as a TeeVee audience.

Clive Exton, the adapter, is the long time defiler of Christie. Who will do these again in my lifetime now that he has ruined the magic of them? In this case, he transforms the clever narrative device into a journal that Poirot reads as we see the story unfold. Exton doesn't go as far as inferring that what we see is literally what Poirot reads and in fact its sort of a muddle. One gets the impression it is there to mollify curmudgeons like us who wonder where the book fits in.

As with all Exton adaptations, complexities are eliminated, suspects erased and endings turned into dramatic TeeVee events.

But there is some joy here. As dull as the adapter is, the director tries to be clever. The opening shot, where Poirot recovers the journal, is a terrific piece of staging and I would be proud of it if it were mine. Throughout, he artfully plays on the nature of shadows. Just a little more would have been welcome.

Each of these plays by the BBC rulebook of places and faces. One of those rules is that one of the young women must be very pretty. In the past, we've even seen Polly Walker. Here, the duty falls to Daisy Beaumont.

Ted's Evaluation -- 2 of 3: Has some interesting elements.

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