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Fail Safe (TV Movie 2000) Poster

(2000 TV Movie)

Goofs

Jump to: Anachronisms (1) | Factual errors (3) | Revealing mistakes (1)

Anachronisms 

At one point near the beginning a banner behind Hank Azaria is seen for an event dated 1975, well after this is set.
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Factual errors 

General Bogan is wearing the Air Force Good Conduct ribbon. It is clearly visible, 4th row from the top, center ribbon. Even if this impossibility was correct, it would not be in the order shown and in a row just beneath the high decoration of the silver star. It is of a much lower order of distinction and would belong in the bottom row of ribbons. This Air Force version ribbon was instituted in 1963 to replace the old red/white Army ribbon. It would have been impossible for him to have earned it as an enlisted airman since this film takes place about the same time it was instituted, therefore its display is improper.
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The enlisted missile technical expert referred to as "Sergeant Collins" is listed in the credits as "SMSgt Collins". Air Force speak for "Senior Master Sergeant". He is in fact wearing the rank insignia of a "Chief Master Sergeant" which is one grade above Senior Master Sgt.
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General Bogan refers to the enlisted missile technician as "Sergeant Collins" even though he is clearly wearing the stripes of a Chief Master Sergeant. In the A.F. a Chief Master Sergeant is always referred to as "Chief" and never as "Sergeant".
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Revealing mistakes 

When Buck begins translating, he begins speaking *immediately* upon hearing the Soviet premier speak, betraying the fact that he's just reciting lines in a script. A real translator would need to listen to most of the first sentence before speaking, especially with languages that place the verb at or near the end of the sentence, as most languages other than English do.
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Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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