May Barry, a young bride, receives a visit from a girl chum during her husband's absence. In a spirit of mischief the chum dresses up in Barry's clothes, and when Barry comes home ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
The Husband (as William Walthall)
...
May Berry - the Wife
...
The Wife's Chum - the Masquerader
Edit

Storyline

May Barry, a young bride, receives a visit from a girl chum during her husband's absence. In a spirit of mischief the chum dresses up in Barry's clothes, and when Barry comes home unexpectedly Mrs. Barry hides the girl in her room and refuses to permit him to enter. Jealous, he becomes furious, and his wife comes out and is angered and hurt at his suspicion, and refuses an explanation. John hides behind a screen with murder in his heart, and thinking he has gone, the wife's chum runs out. Crushed with shame and regret, Barry pleads with his wife for forgiveness, and realizing that he has had his jealousy cured she grants it. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 March 1912 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The newly married wife's chum came to see her friend dressed as a man
15 October 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Just for a joke, the newly married wife's chum came to see her friend dressed as a man. She was bashful about letting the husband of her friend see her in the man's togs. So, on his sudden coming home, she and her friend retreat into the bedroom. The young and not very experienced wife is angered by her husband's natural jealousy and refuses to tell him who the boy is, but, just as a tragedy is near, the husband recognizes the girl. Mr. Wm. Walthall plays the husband. Miss Fernleigh, the wife, and Miss Robinson the masquerader. It is well photographed and very well acted. - The Moving Picture World, March 30, 1912


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?