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How I Play Golf, by Bobby Jones No. 10: 'Trouble Shots' (1931)

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Joe E. Brown bets Edward G. Robinson dinner that Brown can beat golf master Bobby Jones in a game. Brown hedges the bet by arranging for Jones to hit Brown's drives and Brown to hit Jones's... See full summary »

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(as George E. Marshall)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Bobby Jones ...
Himself - Bobby Jones
O.B. Keeler ...
Himself - Announcer
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Storyline

Joe E. Brown bets Edward G. Robinson dinner that Brown can beat golf master Bobby Jones in a game. Brown hedges the bet by arranging for Jones to hit Brown's drives and Brown to hit Jones's, with Jones to get himself out of any trouble spots that Brown's drives land him in. Jones then demonstrates the proper method for hitting the ball out of roughs, water, weeds, and trees. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Short | Sport

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September 1931 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Trouble Shots  »

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1.37 : 1
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Trivia

During filming of this episode, George Marshall and crew were interrupted on five consecutive takes because of gunshot sounds from filming of an Indian raid scene at nearby Paramount Studios. Marshall's men telephoned the studio. They came to a mutual agreement that a whistle would sound from the studio to notify them when it was safe to film. See more »

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How I Play Golf, by Bobby Jones No. 10: 'Trouble Shots' (George Marshall, 1931) **1/2
14 April 2008 | by (Naxxar, Malta) – See all my reviews

I'm no golf enthusiast myself (also perhaps because so many comedians have lampooned this form of sport) and, at first, I thought this was included on the BULLETS OR BALLOTS (1936) DVD because it was made the same year; actually, it turned out to be an even older program – but the catch is that it featured three Hollywood stars alongside golfer Jones, and one of them is none other than the lead of BULLETS himself: Edward G. Robinson! He and comic Joe E. Brown make a bet that the latter can offer a serious challenge to Jones at the sport: the idea, however, is that Brown is so bad that his ball always falls in perilous territory and that it's Jones who has to pick up the shot. However, the golfer's prowess is so that he always manages to extract himself from the dilemma – with his moves subsequently re-produced in slow-motion and explained for the benefit of the audience! By the way, the other star who turns up at the site of the game is Douglas Fairbanks Jr., who had not long before this co-starred with Robinson in the film that made the latter's name – co-incidentally, another gangster picture, the seminal LITTLE CAESAR (1931).


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