The Midnight Special (1972) - News Poster

(1972–1981)

News

Sundance Film Review: ‘Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World’
Although its reach occasionally exceeds its grasp, Catherine Bainbridge’s “Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World” earns respect as much for its achievement as its ambition, while offering a celebratory examination of the often-underappreciated role played in the development of American popular music by singers, musicians, and songwriters of Native American ancestry. The film is structured more or less as a series of individual portraits of 10 significant artists, ranging from Delta blues great Charley Patton to iconic electric guitarist Jimi Hendrix (who was part Cherokee) to living legend Robbie Robertson. A few episodes are less satisfying than others, but only because they spotlight intriguing yet obscure figures that audiences likely would want to learn about in greater detail.

The title comes from “Rumble,” the smash hit 1958 instrumental single by Link Wray (born in New Carolina to Shawnee parents) driven by innovative power chord riffs that would later influence Iggy Pop,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Prince Remembered by The Late Show: His Aura 'Filled Everybody's Hearts'

Prince Remembered by The Late Show: His Aura 'Filled Everybody's Hearts'
Stephen Colbert and Late Show bandleader Jon Batiste took a moment on Thursday to reflect upon the artist who will forever be known as Prince.

RelatedWhat to Watch: 20/20: Prince, Death of a Legend

Before having the Ed Sullivan Theater lights dimmed to purple, Colbert gave Batiste the spotlight to share an anecdote about the seven-time Grammy winner, who died on April 21 at the all-too-young age of 57. Though he’ll most be remembered for timeless classics such as “Purple Rain” and “Kiss,” Batiste’s memory of working with the icon involved a lesson in courtesy.

Later in the show, Hamilton
See full article at TVLine.com »

Music and Sex #5: Marching, Stealing, Singing, Puking, Spinning

Music and Sex: Scenes from a life - A novel in progress by Roman AkLeff (first installment can be read here; second here; third here; fourth here).

Other opportunities to interact with women included the marching band. It wasn't much of a band, but that didn't bother Walter. That meant it didn't take up much of his time. With the occasional exception, the same songs were played at every football game, so one rehearsal per week sufficed. In high school he'd been the third or fourth best trombonist, but here there was just one other trombonist, and they were on par with each other. If Walter felt like skipping rehearsal one week, nobody cared, since the music was easy and he could sight-read it adequately.

Nor did he have to practice marching formations, because they really didn't bother with that. Their formations were a sort of rebellion, illustrations synced to
See full article at CultureCatch »

AMC Networks’ Yeah! App Offers Up This Is Spinal Tap Free Through 4/11

Whether you’re new to Tap, or have seen them in concert (like me), it’s hard to argue with free, and the Yeah! App from AMC Networks is offering This is Spinal Tap – The Special Features Version for free through April 11th.

Far more than just a ‘Pop Up Video’ version of films, the Yeah! App gives you a completely unique experience, and none of the films is packed with more awesome than This is Spinal Tap, which not only pulls in hundreds of cool notes, but gives you some incredible insights from a variety of legendary rockers… and Jack Black.

Check out the full details below, and make sure you don’t miss this opportunity to enjoy this truly special viewing experience.

Yeah!, the New iPad Movie App from AMC Networks, Offers This Is Spinal Tap – The Special Features Version Gratis to All iPad Users Through April 11

On
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Watch Performances from the Inside Llewyn Davis Concert “Another Day, Another Time” and Read the Full Set List

There was no lack of entertainment options this past Sunday evening. There was the series finale of Breaking Bad, the season premieres of Homeland and Eastbound & Down, the Falcons/Patriots game for football fans, and if you were in New York City, you might have gone to “Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of Inside Llewyn Davis.” The incredible line-up of artists included The Avett Brothers, Marcus Mumford, Conor Oberst, Patti Smith, Jack White, Colin Meloy, Milk Carton Kids, and many more along with Inside Llewyn Davis stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, John Goodman, Adam Driver, and Stark Sands. A few of the performances from the concert have popped up online, and they’re terrific. The full concert will air on Showtime on December 13th, and I hope it’s eventually released as an album. Hit the jump to see some of the performances. Inside Llewyn Davis opens December 6th.
See full article at Collider.com »

Jobriath: the man who fell to earth

Billed as the 'new Bowie', Jobriath exploded onto the glam rock scene in the 1970s – and then disappeared. Marc Almond salutes a personal hero

Britain in the early 1970s was going through a depression: the naive dreams and optimism of the 1960s had soured and evaporated; life was filled with drudgery, strikes, power cuts and unemptied bins. Against this colourless backdrop, glam rock emerged, sprinkling glitter over the grime. And its gods – Marc Bolan with his cosmic love songs, Bryan Ferry with his glamorous cinematic sleaze – reigned supreme. David Bowie was busy transforming the musical landscape.

The British music press of the time was a lads' domain, deeply homophobic; the rule was you had to be a serious musician who had paid some dues. Bowie, who had been reluctantly accepted, was becoming a phenomenon. Ferry's sci-fi, 1950s-inspired torch songs were considered fresh and alluring, played on a strange new electronic instrument called a synthesiser.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jobriath: the man who fell to earth

Billed as the 'new Bowie', Jobriath exploded onto the glam rock scene in the 1970s – and then disappeared. Marc Almond salutes a personal hero

Britain in the early 1970s was going through a depression: the naive dreams and optimism of the 1960s had soured and evaporated; life was filled with drudgery, strikes, power cuts and unemptied bins. Against this colourless backdrop, glam rock emerged, sprinkling glitter over the grime. And its gods – Marc Bolan with his cosmic love songs, Bryan Ferry with his glamorous cinematic sleaze – reigned supreme. David Bowie was busy transforming the musical landscape.

The British music press of the time was a lads' domain, deeply homophobic; the rule was you had to be a serious musician who had paid some dues. Bowie, who had been reluctantly accepted, was becoming a phenomenon. Ferry's sci-fi, 1950s-inspired torch songs were considered fresh and alluring, played on a strange new electronic instrument called a synthesiser.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Indie Horror Month: Ron Purtee’s Top Five Independent Horror Films

In a very short time, filmmaker Ron Purtee is becoming quite the expert on creating no-budget shorts. His first effort, Becoming Undead, garnered a lot of attention from Internet audiences and led to Purtee’s next project - The Social Media Massacre, which the filmmaker hopes will some day become a trilogy of films.

Dread Central recently caught up with Purtee to find out what some of his favorite independent genre flicks are.

1. Raymond Did It (Written/Directed by Travis Legge)

I had the pleasure of seeing this on the big screen, and it did not disappoint. It's a huge throwback to films like Prom Night and Halloween. And the kills? Well, the kills are some of the most inventive things I've ever seen. Made me not want to do my laundry for a week. My family was less than happy.

2. Frozen (Written/Directed by Adam Green)

What can I
See full article at Dread Central »

See also

External Sites