Tom Dean, a young man without means, is in love with Rose Neville, daughter of a well-to-do southern planter. Rose is an ardent sympathizer of the Confederate cause, while Tom is a follower... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Tom Dean
...
Rose Neville
...
Colonel Neville
...
Mrs. Neville
...
Bill Wheeler
Edit

Storyline

Tom Dean, a young man without means, is in love with Rose Neville, daughter of a well-to-do southern planter. Rose is an ardent sympathizer of the Confederate cause, while Tom is a follower of the Union principles. Rose's father refuses to countenance Tom's suit and does not conceal his distaste for the young man. Just at this time news comes of the declaration of war. Tom goes north, enlists and is placed in command of a company of Union cavalry. Three years go by but Rose hears nothing from Tom, to whom she is still faithful. Tom receives an order directing him to burn all houses five miles south and to take particular care to destroy the home of the Confederate, James Neville, together with all personal property. This is exceedingly unpleasant to the soldier but his orders must be obeyed and they are carried out to the letter. Bill Wheeler, a worthless scamp, is attracted by Rose's charms and when the girl resents his advances, he joins a party of bushwhackers, who are nothing more... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 May 1912 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Such a fine action was worthy of a picture
22 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A good and thrilling wartime picture well made and effective. It has interesting Southern scenes and a very acceptable heroine and good hero. It is much better in its idea than usual, although it utilizes the well-known, substantial melodramatic formula. The ugly villain, seeking vengeance for a well-deserved whipping, has brought his tough bushwhackers and is attacking in a cabin the pretty heroine and her family. The hero, a Northern lieutenant, sees this and dashes in to help in the defense. The odds are twenty to one and the defender's ammunition is running short. The heroine darts out, breaks through the line and rides for help. She comes on the field just before a skirmish between the Blue and Grey and brings, under a flag of truce, both sides to the rescue. It is very well done and very commendable. Emerson says that a noble action makes the bystanders shine. A truly noble or truly human action in a picture lifts a whole audience up and adds to its life. This effect is far more marked when the action is fresh, as in this case. This picture convinces us that the uniting of Blue and Grey, and the Stars and Stripes, with the Stars and Bars fluttering alongside, riding to help against a lawless band, was possible. Such a fine action was worthy of a picture. If it were taken from history, as it must have been, it would have been a good thing to have said so in a leader or a subtitle. The photography is good. It is a worthy picture.

  • The Moving Picture World, June 8, 1912



0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?