7.0/10
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Tartuffe (1978)

| Comedy | TV Movie

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(by), (English verse translation by)
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Cast overview:
...
Himself - Host
Ruth Livingston ...
Flipote
...
...
Madame Pernelle
...
...
Damis
Johanna Leister ...
Mariane
Peter Coffield ...
Cleante
...
...
...
Roy Brocksmith ...
Monsieur Loyal
Jim Broaddus ...
Officer
Gene O'Neill ...
Deputy

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The video and DVD list this as running 130 minutes; however, this is not correct. See more »

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Version of Tartyuf (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Molière
14 January 2006 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This is an excellent adaptation for the small screen of Molière's farce, with a fine cast headed by Donald Moffat in the title role, Tammy Grimes as the female lead and a young Victor Garber as one of the juveniles.

Director Kirk Browning, a specialist in presenting theater on the small screen, keeps up visual interest by careful, slow-paced cuts and judicious, small camera movement to force the viewer's attention. The farce is funny, serious parts clear and if the ending is a *deus ex machina*, it was just the sort of ending to appeal to Molière's patron, the King of France.

Moliere's satires are the glories of the French theater -- particularly if, like I, you have little taste for the solemn bombast of Racine. Here, his target is hypocrisy and the ability of scoundrels to hoodwink the well-meaning. At its premiere it provoked a firestorm of rancor from those who felt it mocked the Roman Catholic Church. Had it been done today, it might have been written with Tartuffe as a televangelist. Indeed, the point could have been made clear by doing it in a modern dress version. Browning and associates, however, decided to avoid cries of outrage by presenting it in period. Wiser, perhaps, than Moliere.


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