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Joe D'Amato Totally Uncut (1999)

The story of Joe d'Amato, Italian director of sexploitation and gore, narrated by himself.

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Himself (as Pierluigi Conti)
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Himself
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Himself (as Luigi Montefiori)
Dirce Funari ...
(archive footage)
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Black Emanuelle / Various Characters (archive footage)
Manlio Gomarasca ...
Himself, interviewer (voice)
Annj Goren ...
(archive footage)
Marina Hedman ...
(archive footage)
...
Herself
Rick 'Ercolino' Martino ...
(archive footage)
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(archive footage)
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(archive footage)
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Himself
...
(archive footage)
Paola Senatore ...
(archive footage)
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Storyline

This film features an extensive interview with Italian movie maven, the late Aristide Massacessi, better known as Joe D'Amato. Through interview clips, and clips from his catalogue of over 100 films, "Joe D'Amato Totally Uncut" traces the director's journey from title designer, to director of photography, and finally to director of some of Italian cinema's most notorious films. D'Amato discusses his feelings about his life, his work, his relationships with such stars as Laura Gemser, and his distaste for hardcore adult cinema. Written by Jonathan Ruskin <JonRuskin@aol.com>

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23 September 1999 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Joe D'Amato Totally Uncut - The Erotic Experience  »

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(edited)

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1.33 : 1
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Features Emanuelle in Bangkok (1976) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Documentary on Joe D'Amato must-see
10 March 2016 | by (Italy) – See all my reviews

Joe D'Amato Totally Uncut "a respectable product. Wow, I consider it very interesting from all points of view, very thorough, superbly crafted and well made. I'm not a lover of the "documentary" but this time I wanted to make an exception, primarily because shot by Roger Fratter, an indie filmmaker that I am following with great interest for some time and I am very attracted by his way of making films, and secondly, because it was dedicated to one of my favorite directors, or the legendary and all too famous Joe D'amato aka Aristide Massaccesi, famous not only in Italy but also abroad (especially in the US) who died prematurely in 1999 only sixty-two. I must admit that I have been very difficult to recover these movies, in fact, in the late nineties and early two thousand, I went out in home video as an attachment to the magazine of cinema "Nocturno", specifically in three VHS, the first sixty minutes which analyzed the films of Joe D'Amato, the longest and most detailed generically rather the other two, the first by an hour and fifty minutes dedicated predominantly erotic and the second by an hour and twenty minutes that dealt with analyzing the 'horror and thriller. However, there are around other versions of this audiovisual product, bootleg versions with different images of movies and probably without the prior authorization of the director himself and maybe non-integral. Not finding the DVD version (I think it never left), I had to search for the seas and mountains, and that only thanks to a collector I managed to recover, and I could enjoy as well, about four total hours of interviews with Joe d'Amato, documentary among other things embellished with the participation of actors, producers, writers etc ... who have worked with him and who deliver an even richer tone to this work. The Roman director is considered the king of film genres, backed by about two hundred feature films, experimenting with virtually every imaginable kind, including porn, genre he defined very clearly NOT favorite, and he considered a kind of cinematic universe part, and that there had experimented only was a purely economic issue, and for the simple reason that it was much sought only to direct that particular kind of movie, but the fact remains that the efforts had nevertheless always and unfailing professionalism and competence although with the price of being unjustly defined by many, a red-light movie director, and to make things worse, and that this production took place in the last decade before his death. To report on how the aforementioned director, in his long career, was to be considered "complete" and lavishing in other areas, in fact, well directed, also confronted as an actor, producer, set designer ... and especially in the context of the Director photography, which according to her he felt more marked and more qualified. The interviews are very pleasant and instructive to see, Joe D'amato (perpetually with cigarette in hand) is very friendly, affable shows, and has a certain sympathy and irony, telling interesting and tasty anecdotes, trivia and background information regarding many of his films, the locations and actors, thus having the advantage of enriching (and impress) not just the viewer. Based on what I read around, Joe D'Amato Totally Uncut "is very well known abroad and who has enjoyed a good distribution, arriving to be broadcast in countries like Brazil, Portugal, France. Virtually a must !!! What else to say? Roger Fratter packs a welcome tribute to Joe D'Amato and with this documentary not exaggerating to say that the first has something in common with both the second film layer and both quantity. In the first definition, in Bergamo, this director's films are noted items and features conductive Joe d'Amato, including the use for example scenes of gore, splatter, sex sequences and nudity, but keeping however their personal style while about prolificacy Roger Fratter it is also in its own way, in fact, during his career he has released to date twelve feature films, two documentaries and two hundred and fifty short films. Also on this film there is also a documentary made right on him, by such a title did to Joe D'amato, or "Roger Fratter Totally Uncut" But that's another story ..


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