IMDb > The Score (2001) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
The Score
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
The Score More at IMDbPro »

Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 1 of 44:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]
Index 439 reviews in total 

60 out of 78 people found the following review useful:

Three of the best actors from their generation shine.

Author: Seth Paulo from Windsor Locks, CT
18 July 2001

The Score seems to start off slow for some, but the film's speed is important for the movie. It shows how DeNiro's character lives his life and his life is essential to the plot. "One more" is what he has been saying for years, but this time he means it and will do whatever it takes to make sure nothing goes wrong. Edward Norton's character gives Bob the most grief because he isn't sure if Norton will fly straight. Norton's performance is doubly magnificent and anyone who hasn't seen this actor in action is missing out big time. Brando delivers about 5 scenes that are right on key and provides some comic relief that fits nicely. Overall a really good film that will leave audiences with their jaws on the floor.

Was the above review useful to you?

66 out of 92 people found the following review useful:

Mastering suspense without violence

9/10
Author: trobster from Seattle
3 July 2004

I found The Score a very rare treat in the era of Kill Bill 2 and Die Hard 9. In The Score there is plenty of suspense but very little violence. If I explain this too much, I will spoil.

Except for lots of swear words, this is clearly PG-13, and provides a strong lesson in how to craft an action movie without a lot of explosions and gunfights. Plus: three generations of Method actors is a real treat, with Brando playful and seemingly content, DeNiro cool beyond cool, and Norton riffing away the whole movie. [Regarding DeNiro: what's cooler than a) managing a sleek jazz club, in b) sleek Montreal, with c) Angela Bassett as your sleek flight attendant girlfriend?!] Rent it soon >> it's a sleeper.

Was the above review useful to you?

43 out of 52 people found the following review useful:

Modern Crime Movie Where Acting Takes Precedence Over Action

8/10
Author: ccthemovieman-1 from United States
21 July 2006

Excellent acting is the attraction in this low-key heist movie, which only gets into high gear in the last 30 minutes of the two hours, and features some nice twists. Otherwise, it's a bit talky with a few lulls.

However, I still found it interesting thanks to Edward Norton's superb acting. His character, "Jack Teller" was very intriguing. Robert De Niro, as "Nick Wells" also was good to watch. De Niro rarely is boring. The third major player here is the even-more famous Marlon Brando, who only is referred to as "Max." This certainly isn't one of his more appealing roles but then, how many did he play since the '60s anyway? He - like Norton and De Niro - always grabs your attention regardless of the role, too.

Set in Canada, there were great shots of Montreal in this film, and a sharp DVD picture to show off the city. For those looking for a lot of action, skip this, but for those who are more interested in great acting, check this movie out.

Was the above review useful to you?

50 out of 67 people found the following review useful:

Entertaining

8/10
Author: preppy-3 from United States
30 July 2001

A robber, Nick (Robert De Niro) wants to retire and marry his girlfriend (Angela Bassett). But a friend of his Max (Marlon Brando) convinces him to do one last job with young brash Jackie (Edward Norton). Naturally something goes wrong. Nothing new or inventive here but very well-done and engrossing. Also it's a pleasure to see three exceptional actors doing good work and enjoying themselves (especially Brando). Only complaint--Bassett (another great actor) is completely wasted. Worth catching. Also, it needs to be seen on a wide screen--director Frank Oz uses the whole screen inventively more than once.

Was the above review useful to you?

36 out of 42 people found the following review useful:

Standard plotting made better by cast

Author: bob the moo from United Kingdom
1 September 2003

Nick Wells is a patient, professional, old school thief who works alone. A narrow escape convinces him that it is time to pack it up and settle down with his casual girlfriend Diane. However his middleman Max comes to him with a big score worth millions each and begins to try and convince him to do it. Acting as a downside to the job is Jack Teller, the guy with the insider information who Nick must work with as partners on the job. Even as trust is built between the three men, little things begin to be revealed that could put the whole job at risk.

Very few films are excellent in every regard, some have great plots but low production values where others have multimillion budgets but awful stories. The Score is rightly sold on it's cast for it as little else to offer an audience other than that. The plot is overly familiar and, while not bad, certainly doesn't hold any great surprises for anyone who's seen any `one last job' movies before. The telling is a little slow but holds the attention pretty well, while the job itself is unspectacular but enjoyable.

What makes it worth watching over many other similar twisty heist movies is the cast, who manage to make the material seem better by their inclusion. None of them really have anything special to work with but they all do well and do professional jobs. Norton is probably the standout of the film as he plays several types of character and is good in them all. De Niro does a reasonable job without being flashy or looking like he's making too much of an effort. Brando is OK but now always seems to have a half smile on his face to suggest he isn't taking anything seriously. I don't understand why Bassett bothered to be involved as her part is very small and doesn't add very much to the film – maybe it was a bigger part in the script?

Overall this film is basically nothing new and can be seen in many different forms at video stores world-wide. The thing that helps lift this a little above the rest is not the plot but the talented cast that have been assembled to run it. I enjoyed it and think it is worth watching for that.

Was the above review useful to you?

58 out of 89 people found the following review useful:

Not bad, but...

Author: Wizard-8 from Victoria, BC
22 December 2001

First of all, I didn't hate this movie. The acting was good, the locations were colorful and interesting, and I wasn't bored. (Even though the plot of the movie moved slowly, each scene was interesting for one thing or another.) But we've all seen this basic plot many times. Sometimes seeing a formula once again can be fun, if it's filled with energy or a different perspective. But this movie just seemed content to present what we've seen before, and add nothing new to them. If you're bored this movie will do, but I don't think it's one to go out of your way for.

(P.S. - Fans of Brando and Bassett will be disappointed; not only are their roles very small, but their parts could easily have been written out with no real consequence to the story.)

Was the above review useful to you?

24 out of 26 people found the following review useful:

conventional but stylish caper film

Author: Roland E. Zwick (magneteach@aol.com) from United States
20 January 2002

`The Score' is a fun, stylish return to the `Rififi,' `Topkapi' school of crime drama. The object of this particular heist is a 17th Century royal scepter from France that happens to be languishing in the basement of the Montreal customhouse just asking to be taken. One of the would-be takers is Nick Wells (Robert De Niro), a seasoned heister dreaming of the quiet life of retirement but compelled to do this one last job as a favor to Max (Marlon Brando), an old buddy in hock to some pretty dangerous mob figures. Completing the triangle is Jack Teller (Edward Norton), a brilliant but brash young criminal mastermind whose high-risk temperament is placed in direct counterpoint to Nick's cool, levelheaded demeanor.

Perhaps the most amazing triumph for director Frank Oz is his success at pulling together this impressive cast of stellar heavyweights who cut across three generations of movie acting. Of course, one might wish to see them in roles more demanding of their thespian talents, but we moviegoers will take these three superstars any way we can get them. And `The Score' is certainly very entertaining on its own terms. The technical elements involved in the planning of the heist are beautifully detailed from start to finish. And Oz generates genuinely nail-biting suspense in many sequences involving close quarters and close calls. In addition, the Montreal setting is novel and fresh and it is enhanced by some very impressive wide screen photography.

A film like `The Score' lives or dies based on the intricacy of its plotting and the expertise of its craft. In both cases, `The Score' excels as an outstanding example of this noble and time-honored genre. And watching these three acting giants doing their thing in a movie together is OUR well-earned reward.

Was the above review useful to you?

29 out of 39 people found the following review useful:

A Bang of (surprisingly) fresh filmaking

10/10
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States
13 July 2001

The Score is a movie that holds many elements together that makes is a highly watchable and ultimately suspensful crime movie. These elements are the cast, which has 3 of the finest American actors to ever grace the screen- Robert DeNiro, Edward Norton, and Don Vito Corleone himself, Marlon Brando. Also though another elements is from director Frank Oz, who is a household name (at least for me) by being a muppeteer since 1963 and has also directed some hits (Bowfinger, What About Bob) and misses (In and Out, Stepsitter). Now he tackles his first crime drama, and he does it exceptionally well in holding the suspense in a way that will hold it all together, unlike some thrillers that always pop up suspense and by the time the end comes your tired out from it all. While The Score holds a couple of things also that keep it from greatness (Angela Basset's character isn't really needed for DeNiro's motivations and also the trailer revealed too much of the movie so that the movie had to try extra hard to be thrilling), it also holds controlled and outstanding performances and crackerjack suspense throughout. One of the few real must-see movies of the summer. A

Was the above review useful to you?

30 out of 42 people found the following review useful:

The Score scores big!

Author: Staci Layne Wilson from Author of Staci's Guide to Animal Movies
13 July 2001

Yep, it's another clichéd script: Career cat burglar Nick (Robert De Niro, Meet the Parents) is about to take on a nearly impossible heist that requires his joining forces with a talented but brash young accomplice, Jackie (Edward Norton, American History X), whom he doesn't particularly like. The dubious alliance, arranged by Nick's longtime friend and fence, Max (Marlon Brando, Don Juan deMarco), throws a wrench into Nick's plan to retire from crime and settle down with his lady love, Diane (Angela Bassett, Supernova).

Uh-huh. The old, "One more job, then I'll retire," routine. But that's where the routine ends. The trio of brilliant lead actors transcend the plot, and overcome the sometimes sluggish direction (courtesy of Frank Oz, who did Bowfinger and many other comedies -- and children's flicks, such as The Indian in the Cupboard). It's an absolute pleasure from start to finish, just to watch and study these men -- but then, they could probably be taking turns reading the phone book and make it seem fascinating. (Angela Bassett is excellent too, but she is unfortunately relegated to the one-dimensional, obligatory "girlfriend role" here.)

The score is a big one: a 16th century royal scepter worth $30 million dollars. It's locked away in the basement of The Customs House in Montreal, Canada, and security is getting tighter by the day. Jackie infiltrates the House, posing as "Brian," a janitor afflicted with cerebral palsy. Norton is flawless in his dual roles (remember his schizo debut in Primal Fear?), and better still, he plays Brian as funny and endearing without ever creeping into caricature-ville. Meanwhile, Nick is figuring out how to bypass the ironclad security system and crack the uncrackable safe. DeNiro doesn't have a lot to do with his character, but what he was given, he runs with. He not only makes you believe the clichés, you like them, dammit. Brando is clearly having fun with his role -- one tailor-made just for him. "I wrote the part specifically for Brando," said co-writer Kario Salem. "I imagined him as a cross between Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams -- someone of great flamboyance and humor and wit and someone of great size, both literally and figuratively." Brando nails it all the way. (Interesting aside: the roles of Nick and Jackie were originally slated for Michael Douglas and Ben Affleck.)

The twist ending is given away a bit too early (but then there's another twist), and there isn't anything here we haven't seen before. However, with three generations of the world's best actors on the screen, The Score scores big.

Was the above review useful to you?

19 out of 24 people found the following review useful:

Worth seeing for Brando's 15 minutes of screen time alone!

Author: uds3 from Longmont, Colorado
16 December 2001

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Although not in the same category as RONIN and impossibly distant from HEAT (what isn't???) this is a superb heist flick for those who really WANT to experience acting at top drawer level!

The plot - doesn't matter...ageing safe-breaker De Niro is offered that "one last" job by Brando who creates in his miniscule screen time, one of the greatest supporting roles I have ever seen in a half century of movies. The scene where De Niro is about to back out of the heist leaving Max (Brando) stranded and with no way out of his financial dilemma is one of the most moving and magnificent verbal exchanges in all screen history!

Similarly Ed Norton's turn as the autistic Brian....gives Hoffman's RAINMAN a run for its money! This guy is your once-in-a-lifetime actor.

Yes, it is slow...painful at times! The end is predictable and not what you'd call overly memorable..and to be frank, I have NEVER seen so many people walk out of a film as I did during THE SCORE, but that's their loss..this is a terrific film for those with staying power and appreciation. The greatness outweighs the mediocrity!

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 1 of 44:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Plot synopsis Ratings
Awards Newsgroup reviews External reviews
Parents Guide Plot keywords Main details
Your user reviews Your vote history