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Old Scrooge (1913)

Scrooge (original title)

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Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge is visited on Christmas Eve by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley, who tries to help him change his selfish ways and redeem his soul by showing ... See full summary »

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(story "A Christmas Carol"),
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Cast

Cast overview:
Seymour Hicks ...
William Lugg
Leedham Bantock
J.C. Buckstone
Dorothy Buckstone
Leonard Calvert
Osborne Adair
Adela Measor
Ellaline Terriss
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Storyline

Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge is visited on Christmas Eve by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley, who tries to help him change his selfish ways and redeem his soul by showing him how much his greed has cost him and will continue to cost him if he doesn't atone. An early silent adaptation of the classic story, this version differs from others in that Marley also acts as the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future. Written by page8701

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Genres:

Short | Drama | Fantasy

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Release Date:

January 1914 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Old Scrooge  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Dispenses with the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future; Marley's ghost stands in for them. See more »

Connections

Version of The Alcoa Hour: The Stingiest Man in Town (1956) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Young Scrooge, Old Scrooge and Middle Aged Scrooge
7 December 2008 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Seymour Hicks, in a long and distinguished career, had a specialty of playing Scrooge on stage for many a decade. He first essayed the role in 1901, when barely past thirty and got bad reviews because he couldn't play 'old' well -- he got better at it. In his time, he committed the role to film twice: in this silent film (re-edited in the mid-twenties) and in a sound version in 1935.

In this earlier version he gives a fine performance, but it is quite clearly gauged for the stage. He twitches, he shakes himself out of camera range and he is the angriest Scrooge I have ever seen: not in the sense of ready to lose his temper, but angry all the time. It's an interesting interpretation and must have been a corker on stage. But on the theater screen it is, alas, just too big.


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