Needs 5 Ratings

A Marriage of Convenience (1912)

Billy Emerson and Mildred Girard are secretly engaged to be married after Billy graduates from West Point and becomes a lieutenant. A very serious setback to their tentative understanding ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

(scenario)
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Mildred Girard
George Ober ...
Stephen Girard, Mildred's Father
...
Mrs. Girard, Mildred's Mother
...
Billy Emerson, Mildred's Fiancé
...
Paul Morley, a Morphine Addict
Tefft Johnson ...
John Morley, Paul's Father
Edit

Storyline

Billy Emerson and Mildred Girard are secretly engaged to be married after Billy graduates from West Point and becomes a lieutenant. A very serious setback to their tentative understanding occurs when Mr. Girard loses heavily in a stock transaction that places himself under obligations to his friend Morley, whose son Paul, is anxious to marry Mildred. He asks Mr. Girard for his daughter's hand and he, in return for his father's favor, consents to, and insists upon the marriage. Paul Morley is an inveterate "dope" fiend and secretly and periodically applies the needle to his arm. After his marriage to Mildred, his father discovers that Paul has the morphine habit and disinherits him. Mildred, with her father and mother, go abroad and while away, receive news of the death of Paul Morley. Mildred, now a widow, ends the news to Billy Emerson, and says she longs to see him and has never ceased to love him. Billy, who is now a lieutenant, stationed at the Philippines, cables back word to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 December 1912 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

We take pleasure in expressing our admiration for the artist who imagined the scenes
20 April 2017 | by See all my reviews

The author of this narrative is not named. Seeing that there is one group of scenes and one character only in it that is strongly conceived, we read between the lines to this effect, that a scenario with a very trite situation was submitted, but that it gave a chance for the addition and was rewritten in the Vitagraph studio. We take pleasure in expressing our admiration for the artist who imagined the scenes that are good, so good that they raise the whole offering to a high plan of desirability. Looked at roughly, the picture tells the old story of a girl who loves a worthy man; but who consents to wed the son of a creditor of her father. The character of this good- for-nothing youth gives tone and meaning to the whole situation, even lends an Ibsenesque touch to it. He is a morphine fiend, even his father doesn't know how badly off he is until immediately after the ceremony. There are in the opening a few trite scenes and then comes a scene in which we begin to suspect the reason why the youth's father wants him to get married to any girl who will be likely to make him brace up. He is playing a rather unpleasant game for the sake of his boy. Following this scene, comes the wedding ceremony at which the morphine fiend breaks down and hurriedly excuses himself. The two fathers, in a very fine scene, find him in the next room and discover the reason for the queer action. All this group of scenes is far above the average. It is followed by a tritely pleasant ending. Mr. James Young holds up the opium taker very well indeed. As finely played, by George Ober and Tefft Johnson, are the roles of the girl's father and the boy's father. Edith Story does excellent work as the girl; Rose Tapley as her mother, and James Morrison as her lover. - The Moving Picture World, January 4, 1913


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page