During Nick Austin's imprisonment, his wife passes away. Before she dies, she writes a note to her husband, asking him to put her little girl in the care of an orphan asylum. Mrs. Downes, ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Nick Austin
Florence Turner ...
Mrs. Downes
Harry T. Morey
Mary Maurice ...
The Grandmother
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Julia Swayne Gordon ...
The Mother of the Convict
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Storyline

During Nick Austin's imprisonment, his wife passes away. Before she dies, she writes a note to her husband, asking him to put her little girl in the care of an orphan asylum. Mrs. Downes, while bringing some of her dead daughter's clothes to the asylum, takes a fancy to Nina Austin and adopts her. One year later, Mrs. Downes visits State's Prison with her adopted daughter and husband. As they pass the cell in which Nick Austin is located, Nina hands him a flower. Eventually Nick Austin is released, and is apprehended of his daughter's whereabouts. Arriving at the Downes' home, he clasps his daughter to his breast, but, realizing his inability to provide for her, withdraws without letting her know their relationship. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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9 June 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The story is told with a keen and delicate sense of values
13 February 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is a life portrayal and it is poignantly acted, especially in the scenes after the childless mother accepts the white carnation, the mother's day flower. This woman adopts the prisoner's child. There is human beauty in the scene in the prison when the woman with the child visits it to distribute flowers. The prisoner doesn't know that he is talking with his own child; because of that scene and all it implies, we understand and are thoroughly convinced by his attitude toward the child after his release and by his sacrifice. The woman who loved the adopted child knows what that sacrifice meant. The story is told with a keen and delicate sense of values that make it clear and convincing. It is acted with much emotional power, especially by the convict and by the woman. The child of the story filled her part charmingly. - The Moving Picture World, June 24, 1911


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