An adaptation of the widely known and universally popular melodrama. "East Lynne." The opening scene shows Carlisle entering with his bride, Isabel. The servants welcome them. Carlisle ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

(novel)
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Storyline

An adaptation of the widely known and universally popular melodrama. "East Lynne." The opening scene shows Carlisle entering with his bride, Isabel. The servants welcome them. Carlisle introduces his wife to Barbara, who is insanely jealous of her. Tea is served, and, at her husband's request, Isabel sits at the piano and sings. Five years pass by and the home is blessed with two children. The mother and father are observed in a pretty domestic scene as Barbara enters and speaks to Carlisle, who departs with her, leaving Isabel jealous and suspicious. Levison, who is in love with Isabel, enters and tells of his love. He is sternly repulsed, crosses to the window and, looking out, sees Carlisle and Barbara in the garden. The latter is weeping and Carlisle is endeavoring to comfort her. Levison calls Isabel to the window and, looking out, misconstrues her husband's actions, and, when Levison again urges his suit, she consents to elope with him. Leaving the villain for a moment, Isabel ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 July 1909 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Released as a split reel along with The Dramatist's Dream (1909). See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The Vitagraph Company should be a little more attentive to details.
28 November 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The Vitagraph Company have given a very graphic reproduction of the well-known melodrama, "East Lynne," in this film. The play is so well known that it requires no detailed explanation to make it plain, but one must commend the actors, who have made "East Lynne" live upon the screen. And these actors are not the barnstorming sort who go roving about the country presenting "East Lynne" to audiences in small towns. They are finished players, and the popular old story assumes an added interest from its presentation by them. The acting of Isabel is perhaps the best, though Barbara is good, although Carlisle is not so successful in developing his part. The whole picture is pleasing, if a drama which ends with death and gloom can be called pleasing. But perhaps one should not criticise a play which has appealed to thousands of people of every type and station for many years and never fails to bring the tears. If the play, as it is commonly shown, is so powerful, surely this motion picture, with every individual a capable and well-trained actor, ought to be even more interesting, and the play should receive a fresh lease of life and interest yet other thousands who have never seen it. The Vitagraph Company should be a little more attentive to details. The wind blew so strong in a supposed "interior" that the draperies stood out straight and the eagle trademark fluttered down from the wall. Succeeding titles such as "After Five Years," or "After Ten Years," we would expect to see some facial change in the actors, or at least a different suit of clothes. – The Moving Picture World, July 10, 1909


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page