In the quaint and happy little village of Cedarville there lives a prosperous miller names Morgan, who had inherited the property from his father before him. He was a kind and indulgent ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
William Stowell ...
Reverend Romaine
Charles Clary ...
Joe Morgan
Frank Weed ...
Simon Slade
Rex De Rosselli ...
Sample Switchell
Thomas Carrigan ...
Frank Slade (as Thomas J. Carrigan)
...
Mrs. Morgan
Baby Remis ...
Little Mary
Vera Hamilton ...
Mehitable Cartwright
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Storyline

In the quaint and happy little village of Cedarville there lives a prosperous miller names Morgan, who had inherited the property from his father before him. He was a kind and indulgent father and husband. Young Simon Slade was employed by Morgan. In order to improve the mill as circumstances required, Morgan was compelled to ask a loan, and same was supplied by Slade. Dark days came upon the happy family. Morgan began to drink and the indurating process sets in. Ill luck seems to meet him at every turn. Two years later we find the two men quarreling and the result was the old mill was sold out by the sheriff. The new miller was none other than Simon Slade, the once trusted employee. Morgan now pleads for a chance to work as a mill hand. Once back in the old familiar place, his little family are again happy, and Joe promises never to drink again. The new miller prospers from the start, but a short time finds Morgan back in the grasp of the Demon Run. The tavern known for miles around ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

12 June 1911 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ten Nights in a Barroom  »

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1.33 : 1
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The acting of the second part is not convincing
13 February 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The difference between a tract and a work of art if, at bottom, one of truthfulness to life. The writer of a tract is so earnest that he forgets the artistic need of seeming to be unbiased; he "rubs it in." It is easier for a moving picture to maintain the illusion even in a tract if the story is human enough for the players to act it sincerely and, while watching the first part of "Ten Nights," this reviewer was surprised at the remarkable power with which it was told. But when, next day, he watched the second part projected and saw the moral reiterated and pointed at the expense of truth, he was much disappointed. The acting of the second part is not convincing, nor are the settings. It gave a sense of distaste, because while it was poignantly moving it was not made to seem truthful. Nothing can be much more truthfully tragic than the condition "Drunk again, fired again and still drinking." But a thousand little lies around a truth don't help it, nor give it more force. When one sees a tragic picture without truth he is apt to feel like one who has received wounds without cause.

  • The Moving Picture World, June 24, 1911



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