A story of paternal devotion. The scene opens in an ill-kept room of a destitute actor, George Ferguson. He is bending over the bed in which his young daughter is lying ill as the postman ... See full summary »

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A story of paternal devotion. The scene opens in an ill-kept room of a destitute actor, George Ferguson. He is bending over the bed in which his young daughter is lying ill as the postman enters with a letter, which proves to be from a theatrical agency giving him work at a card party that evening. The old actor gets out his dress suit, brushes it carefully, and is about to leave as the doctor comes in, examines his sick child and leaves a prescription. After attending to this and bidding his daughter a fond farewell. Ferguson goes to the house designated in the letter, presents his card, is ushered in, and introduced to the guests. Dinner is announced and all sit down to the table. After a while the host takes a diamond from a cabinet and passes it around the table for inspection. During this time, Ferguson, unnoticed, takes different articles of food from the table, putting it in his pocket for the little sick girl at home. The dinner proceeds and the host finally asks for the stone... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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8 May 1909 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A False Accusation, a Story of Paternal Devotion  »

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1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with Dime Novel Dan (1909). See more »

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By no means measures up to their standard
17 September 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

In this story of paternal devotion the Vitagraph Company has developed some dramatic situations which are worth seeing, though the whole picture by no means measures up to their standard. The acting of the father when the police search his pockets and discover the bits of food he has placed there to carry home to his sick daughter is beyond criticism, but that is the climax and the rest is merely commonplace. The congratulations when his story is learned and the diamond is found elsewhere are merely perfunctory. Possibly it might be contended that this is good acting, too, basing the declaration upon the supposition that guests who undertook to congratulate a poor entertainer would do it in that way. The ending is happy, and when the picture ends with the little girl certain of a new and influential friend everyone breathes easier. Photographically the film is uneven, though perhaps it might be contended that even photography in the mixed lighting required is impossible, but the staging should be such that there can he no uneven lighting. It isn't necessary, and it detracts from the attractiveness of an excellent subject. - The Moving Picture World, May 22, 1909


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