Four frames of simultaneous action that alternately follow a smitten lesbian lover as she obsesses over her partner's dalliances and the tense goings-on of a Hollywood film production company.

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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Onyx Richardson
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Victoria Cohen
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Lester Moore
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Sikh Nurse
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Rose
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Therapist
Andrew Heckler ...
Auditioning Actor
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Renee Fishbine
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Randy
Daphna Kastner ...
Auditioning Actor
Patrick Kearney ...
Drug House Owner
Elizabeth Low ...
Penny - Evan's Assistant
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Bunny Drysdale
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Storyline

The primary story with this movie is that it is shown in four simultaneously filmed ninety-three minute single shot takes (in other words, shown in four quadrants), with the actual plot secondary. The four cameras follow the players involved, with two or more of the four cameras sometimes filming the exact same scene from different angles and thus different perspectives. The audio on each of the four quadrants is turned up and down based on which quadrant(s) the viewer should pay most attention to at any given time. The actual plot, which takes place in Hollywood, involves the pre-production by Red Mullet Productions for the movie "Bitch from Louisiana". The production team is in an executive meeting to discuss several aspects of the movie, including problems with one of their own, Alex Green, who has been missing in action from much of the production and this meeting. Alex's problems stem from his substance abuse and philandering, his wife Emma who is contemplating leaving him, of ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for drug use, sexuality, language and a scene of violence | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

28 April 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Time Code  »

Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$93,148 (USA) (28 April 2000)

Gross:

$945,041 (USA) (9 June 2000)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

MPAA Certificate # 37352. See more »

Goofs

When the masseur goes into the film studio and up to the front desk, you can see one of the other cameras coming in on the right of him, just before the camera turns away. See more »

Quotes

Alex Green: This is the most pretentious crap I've ever heard.
Ana Pauls: What?
Alex Green: I'm sorry.
Ana Pauls: I'm sorry, could you speak louder, please?
Alex Green: Do you think anybody sitting around this table has a clue about what you're talking about?
Ana Pauls: No, but it's time to educate people.
Alex Green: You know, we think, "This is crap, but we'll do it for you, and then you do our crap." And that'll be the deal.
Bunny Drysdale: Alex, you are way out of line. I brought Anna here and I brought Joey here, and I expect some respect. You're way out of line.
Alex Green: Come on, Bunny...
Ana Pauls: I ...
[...]
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Connections

References Three Kings (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Single
Written by Ben Watt and Tracey Thorn
Performed by Everything But The Girl
Courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
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User Reviews

 
A daring, original piece of cinema
24 June 2001 | by (Jersey City, NJ) – See all my reviews

"Timecode" is not conventional filmmaking, which is the whole beauty of it. This is a totally improvised piece of cinema, shot on a hand-held camera for 90 minutes straight--not a single cut--and shot in real-time. Every word of dialogue is improvised, the only thing written is the story (also by Mike Figgis). The way it turned out is quite impressive. Of course, the process gets tiresome and repetitive at times, but overall it's a pretty fascinating work that will probably be better appreciated by the more open-minded moviegoer--as opposed to mainstream viewers who will probably view this as just plain weird.

I was really impressed by the talented cast filled with great actors who simply went through the WHOLE ENTIRE process without once messing up. If you watch all these behind-the-scenes specials with actors stumbling line-after-line, doing take-after-take, until they finally get it right the 100th time--it's astounding to see that the whole cast was able to pull this off without a scratch. Even with such talented actors like Stellan Sarsgard, Holly Hunter, Salma Hayek, Jeanne Tripplehorn, etc., I have to commend them especially for taking part in this risky project. This movie not only showcases their knacks for acting, but also their potential to try something new, innovative and quite difficult--after all, taking risks is one of the main elements in becoming a good actor.

This type of format does--at points--feel like a theatrical version of a "Big Brother" episode, but Figgis wrote a story with as much intriguing elements as he can possibly fit into a film of this scope. After all, this is supposed a day-in-the-life type of story and you don't want to be too far-fetched. So he tries to generate as much suspense and intrigue (involving the many smutty attributes of the stereotypical white-collar LA resident) as he possibly could. There are subplots involving drug abuse, alcohol abuse, homosexuality, philandering, jealousy and of course the biggest theme of all...Sex! Naturally, my interest did sometimes drift, but the material compelled me enough to be interested for the majority of the running time. I've never been a fan of those corny reality shows. Quite frankly, I think the kind of reality displayed on those programs is very dull. "Timecode" transcends the dullness of the reality shows and, in a way, the "Blair Witch Project" (which is another reality-based film shot entirely on a hand-held camera, but executed very poorly). The material is engaging to a degree, the actors perform it very well and everything is down-to-earth to preserve its sense of realism. My only criticisms lie in the "earthquake effects." Those looked totally cheesy, created entirely by camera tricks and actors pretending to be shaken up. In one of the closing scenes, Jeanne Tripplehorn is clinging on to a nearby bannister while you can see cars in the background moving along smoothly. He could've done without that pretentious trick.

I'm not saying this a great film, but it is one I'll remember for its unique sense of style and I will always remember Mike Figgis for coming up with this innovative method. If you're tired of mainstream cinema and feel anxious to see something new and exciting--this is a film I would recommend.

My score: 7 (out of 10)


14 of 19 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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Any good? smeggegi5000
How many takes?? shulme
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