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Neptune's Daughters (1900)

A combination of the picture entitled "The Ballet of the Ghosts," and a surf scene; the resulting effect being that the ghostly figures rise up out of the surf and come to the shore, cast ... See full summary »
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A combination of the picture entitled "The Ballet of the Ghosts," and a surf scene; the resulting effect being that the ghostly figures rise up out of the surf and come to the shore, cast their draperies aside and dance a few steps of the ballet, after which they again take up their draperies, and having covered themselves, retreat into the waves. Written by AMB Picture Catalogue (1902)

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Short | Fantasy

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December 1900 (USA)  »

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1.36 : 1
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Edited from Wreck of the Schooner 'Richmond' (1897) See more »

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Dancers in the surf
8 September 2009 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

'Neptune's Daughters (1900)' was produced by prolific early American director Frederick S. Armitage for the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company. The short film is notable for its early use of superimposition, double-printing images from 'Ballet of the Ghosts (1899)' over an ocean landscape from 'Sad Sea Waves (1897).' The result is that the four woman, draped in white, appear to emerge from the ocean like ghosts, before breaking into dance on top of the water surface. Armitage made a few of these short films – including 'Davey Jones' Locker (1900)' and 'A Nymph of the Waves (1900)' – and this is probably the least visually impressive of the three, though all are worthwhile for anybody interested in the early development of cinema's visual effects. 'Neptune's Daughters' can be found in the "Unseen Cinema" box-set, in the volume "Viva La Dance: The Beginnings of Cine-Dance."


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