Two sets of images are superimposed. From the side, we see a two-masted ship. Across the deck walks a skeleton. It sits down, its legs akimbo. The legs separate and continue a dance while ... See full summary »
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Storyline

Two sets of images are superimposed. From the side, we see a two-masted ship. Across the deck walks a skeleton. It sits down, its legs akimbo. The legs separate and continue a dance while the body of the skeleton faces us and the skull moves its jaw bone. It rises and the legs rejoin the skull and body for an additional jig back and forth on deck. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Short | Fantasy

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Release Date:

December 1900 (USA)  »

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1.36 : 1
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Features The Dancing Skeleton (1897) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Skeleton Dance
8 September 2009 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

Around the time that Georges Méliès was experimenting with superimposition and other optical effects to enhance his on-screen "stage acts," American director Frederick S. Armitage was testing similar techniques for manipulating cinematic reality. 'Davey Jones' Locker (1900)' was produced for the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, and was created by double-printing two sets of images, originally filmed between 1896 and 1899, over each other. The result is that the two images – one a character (a dancing skeleton) and the other an environment (a shipwrecked boat in the waves) – appear to coexist with each other, the skeleton given the translucent weightlessness of a ghost or spirit. The film is an amusing curiosity, but lacks the complexity of contemporary Méliès efforts like 'The Four Troublesome Heads (1898)' or 'The One-Man Band (1900).'


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