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The ‘Mystery’ of Oscars: Does ‘Call Me by Your Name’ songwriter Sufjan Stevens have a Best Picture advantage?

The ‘Mystery’ of Oscars: Does ‘Call Me by Your Name’ songwriter Sufjan Stevens have a Best Picture advantage?
The current Oscar front-runner for Best Song is “Remember Me” from the Pixar animated film “Coco.” It gets leading odds of 4/9 based on the combined predictions of thousands of users who have made their picks thus far at Gold Derby. However, might we be underestimating Sufjan Stevens‘s “The Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name”? It ranks third with 16/1 odds despite being the only nominated song from a Best Picture contender. In addition to “Remember Me” it’s up against “This is Me” from “The Greatest Showman,” “Mighty River” from “Mudbound” and “Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall.” But does a Best Picture nomination usually give songwriters an edge?

In the last 30 years there have been 15 times when there was at least one Best Picture nominee in the race for Best Song. Of those 15 instances, a Best Picture nominee won 8 times:

1988: “Let the River Run” from
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Oscars 2018: Which 20 previous winners should present to this year’s 20 acting nominees?

Oscars 2018: Which 20 previous winners should present to this year’s 20 acting nominees?
One of the highlights of the 2009 Academy Awards ceremony was the surprise addition of 20 Oscar winners presenting to that year’s acting nominees. It started with five Best Supporting Actress champs (Whoopi Goldberg, Goldie Hawn, Anjelica Huston, Eva Marie Saint, Tilda Swinton) who gave out the award to Penelope Cruz, welcoming her to their club. While all of those presenting that evening had indeed won the category before, each one often had no connection at all to the person they were introducing.

The following year new producers followed a similar format of five people presenting to a new crop of five for the lead categories only. While all of them had working relationships with the nominees (like Michelle Pfeiffer for Jeff Bridges and Stanley Tucci for Meryl Streep), most of them were not Oscar winners.

SEEOscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary
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The 2018 Oscars: Everything you need to know about the Best Actor race

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The 2018 Oscars: Everything you need to know about the Best Actor raceThe 2018 Oscars: Everything you need to know about the Best Actor raceJenny Bullough and Adriana Floridia2/20/2018 10:21:00 Am

Are you following the awards race and want to enter our Pick the Winners contest, but don't have time to see every nominated performance? We're breaking down the front-runners and underdogs to help you make accurate choices in any Oscar pool! Today we're giving you a rundown of the performances nominated for Best Actor.

The nominees are: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour

Previous Nominations: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Best Actor)

Oldman is definitely the front-runner in this race, having already taken home the Golden Globe and the Screen Actors Guild trophies for his turn as Winston Churchill in the WWII drama. The Academy loves to reward actors who undergo a physical transformation, whether it's gaining weight, losing weight, or enduring hours
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BAFTA Awards: 6 British nominees who beat eventual Oscar winners

BAFTA Awards: 6 British nominees who beat eventual Oscar winners
Since the the BAFTAs moved ahead of the Oscars in 2000, it has become a fairly reliable barometer of who will win in the four acting races at the Academy Awards. However, there have been six occasions when it has gone with home-grown talent over the eventual Oscar winners. And there have been eight other times when British nominees have won without facing the eventual Academy Awards champs.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘The Shape of Water’ dominates with 12 nominations, ‘Darkest Hour’ and ‘Three Billboards’ at 9

Best Actor

2000: Jamie Bell for “Billy Elliot” over Russell Crowe for “Gladiator”; Bell was snubbed by Oscars.

2002: Daniel Day-Lewis for “Gangs of New York” over Adrien Brody for “The Pianist.”

2009: Colin Firth for A Single Man” over Jeff Bridges for “Crazy Heart.”

In 2013, Chiwetel Ejiofor won the BAFTA for “12 Years a Slave,” 2013; Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey (“Dallas Buyers Club”) was not nominated at BAFTA.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 BAFTA Awards: Lesley Manville has home-court advantage over Allison Janney, Laurie Metcalf

2018 BAFTA Awards: Lesley Manville has home-court advantage over Allison Janney, Laurie Metcalf
Lesley Manville has lost her previous two BAFTA Awards bids but third time could be the charm on Sunday as she contends for her scene-stealing turn in “Phantom Thread.” This home-grown talent could be the beneficiary of a split vote between two of the other Best Supporting Actress nominees: Americans Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) and Laurie Metcalf (“Lady Bird”).

While Janney won the Globe, Critics Choice and SAG awards, there is still a sense that this race is far from being labelled a done deal. This isn’t a Gary Oldman situation, wherein his win is all but secured (clear your mantlepiece, Gary, you’ve got a statuette to make room for). Rather, this is still a race that is in flux.

That is where Manville comes in. She and her film made a surprising surge late in the awards race. The veteran character actress numbers among the six Oscar
See full article at Gold Derby »

Good news for ‘This Is Me’: The Globes and Oscars have sung the same tune more often than you might think

Good news for ‘This Is Me’: The Globes and Oscars have sung the same tune more often than you might think
“Remember Me” from “Coco” is the favorite to win the Best Original Song Oscar, but it needs to watch out for “This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman” — not just because it’s a huge hit and NBC is using it as its Winter Olympics soundtrack, but because it’s the Golden Globe champ. Before you scream “The Globes and Oscars never pick the same song winner!”, know that they have agreed the past three years and their split choices are a relatively new phenomenon.

The Globes gave out its first song award to the title track from “Town Without Pity” (1961) — the Oscars went with “Moon River” from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” — but didn’t start handing out the prize annually until three years later. The Globes and Oscars matched only once that decade, for “The Windmills of Your Mind” from “The Thomas Crown Affair” (1968).

See Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez
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BAFTAs 2018: A goodbye trophy for Daniel Day-Lewis (‘Phantom Thread’) would tie the BAFTA record

BAFTAs 2018: A goodbye trophy for Daniel Day-Lewis (‘Phantom Thread’) would tie the BAFTA record
Phantom Thread” is expected to be the last film in Daniel Day-Lewis’s illustrious career as he has announced his plan to retire from acting. Could the Englishman get a farewell hug at the BAFTA Awards? Should he win Best Actor he would walk away from the industry tying the all-time record for most wins.

Up until 1967 the BAFTA Film Awards actually handed out two acting trophies per category: one to a British performer and the other to a foreigner. The current record is five wins and is held by a trio of acclaimed Brits: Maggie Smith, Peter Finch and Judi Dench — Dench technically has six competitive wins if you count the now-defunct category of Most Promising Newcomer, which she won for “Four in the Morning” (1965).

Finch won both the BAFTA and Oscar together just once: Best Actor for “Network” (1976); unfortunately, both of those victories were posthumous as he passed
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Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ Is Getting Way More Expensive: Budget Now Estimated Over $140 Million

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ Is Getting Way More Expensive: Budget Now Estimated Over $140 Million
Martin Scorsese is spending a ton of money for his new gangster movie, “The Irishman.” Multiple sources confirm to Deadline that the budget has skyrocketed past the $140 million mark as principal photography nears its end and the movie’s lengthy post-production process is set to begin.

Part of the reason the movie’s budget continues to climb is because of the de-aging process Scorsese is using to make star Robert De Niro appear decades younger during certain portions of the film. “The Irishman” tells the true story of mobster Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran, who carried out more than 25 hits and was allegedly involved in the death of mob boss Jimmy Hoffa. The film is framed around an older Sheeran looking back on his life, and De Niro plays all iterations of the character.

Scorsese will be working with VFX company Industrial Light & Magic (Ilm) during post-production. The company is
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis wins the “handsomest bludgeon in town” for the second time

Oscars flashback: Daniel Day-Lewis wins the “handsomest bludgeon in town” for the second time
Daniel Day-Lewis is going for his record fourth Best Actor Oscar for Paul Thomas Anderson’s haute couture drama “Phantom Thread.” It was his first collaboration with Anderson on “There Will Be Blood” that won Day-Lewis his second Oscar 10 years ago — or as he calls it in his speech you can watch above, “the handsomest bludgeon in town.”

Day-Lewis dominated the circuit that year for his turn as greedy, vicious oil man Daniel Plainview in “There Will Be Blood,” which was up for eight Oscars and also won Best Cinematography for Robert Elswit.

“I’m looking at this gorgeous thing that you’ve given me and I’m thinking back to the first devilish whisper of an idea that came to him and everything since and it seems to me that this sprang like a golden sapling out of the mad, beautiful head of Paul Thomas Anderson,” Day-Lewis said in his speech.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Revisiting Daniel Day-Lewis and Denzel Washington’s intertwined Oscar history

Revisiting Daniel Day-Lewis and Denzel Washington’s intertwined Oscar history
Daniel Day-Lewis (“Phantom Thread”) and Denzel Washington (“Roman J. Israsel, Esq.”) have a date at the Oscars — and it’s not their first. The Best Actor nominees, who’ve never starred in a film together, have a lot of shared Oscar history, going back to their big breakthroughs early in their careers. Half of the six nominations for Day-Lewis have overlapped with Washington, who’s on his eighth acting nomination (he has another one for producing Best Picture nominee “Fences” last year). But even when the two weren’t nominated simultaneously they still crossed paths somehow.

Day-Lewis and Washington both won their first Oscars on the same night 28 years ago — the former took Best Actor for his portrayal of Christy Brown in “My Left Foot” (1989) and the latter won Best Supporting Actor for playing runaway slave soldier Pvt. Tripp in “Glory” (1989). They both returned the following year to present Best
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Daniel Day-Lewis is an Oscar good luck charm

Daniel Day-Lewis is an Oscar good luck charm
“Phantom Thread”’s over-performance with six Oscar nominations was one of the biggest surprises during Tuesday’s announcement. But maybe we should’ve seen its major nominations for Best Picture, Best Director (Paul Thomas Anderson) and Best Supporting Actress (Lesley Manville) coming because it has an Oscar good luck charm: Daniel Day-Lewis.

Day-Lewis boasts one of the best Oscar track records, with a record three Best Actor wins from his previous five nominations from a comparatively scant resume of 20 films. He received his sixth nomination as expected for “Phantom Thread,” and now for all six of his bids, his films and directors earned nominations as well. The previous five are: 1989’s “My Left Foot” and Jim Sheridan; 1993’s “In the Name of the Father” and Sheridan; 2002’s “Gangs of New York” and Martin Scorsese; 2007’s “There Will Be Blood” and Anderson; and 2012’s “Lincoln” and Steven Spielberg. None of them won.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Michael Stuhlbarg is the sixth actor to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year

2018 Oscars: Michael Stuhlbarg is the sixth actor to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year
Michael Stuhlbarg may not have received an Oscar nomination Tuesday, but he did join a very exclusive club: He’s the sixth performer to appear in three Best Picture nominees in the same year and the first to do so in 15 years.

Stuhlbarg had supporting roles in “Call Me by Your Name,” “The Post” and “The Shape of Water” — a third of the nine-nominee Best Picture lineup. The last person to accomplish this feat was John C. Reilly for his 2002 slate of “Chicago,” “Gangs of New York” and “The Hours.” Before Reilly, you have to go all the way back to the ‘30s for the first four instances. They are:

1934: Claudette Colbert, “It Happened One Night,” “Cleopatra” and “Imitation of Life

1935: Charles Laughton, “Mutiny on the Bounty,” “Les Miserables” and “Ruggles of Red Gap

1937: Adolphe Menjou, “One Hundred Men and a Girl,” “Stage Door” and “A Star Is Born

1939: Thomas Mitchell,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: The Alienist Is a Sure-Footed, Richly Sinister Drama

Adapted from Caleb Carr’s 1994 best seller, The Alienistplops us down in 1896 Manhattan, a town as gloomy, foul and filthy as the Victorian London of Penny Dreadful. Here, though, the monsters aren’t supernatural. Which makes them potentially scarier.

A boy prostitute has been murdered. This, and the fact that he was dressed as a girl, would be of no interest to anyone outside the city’s grimy underworld, except for the killer’s unusually brutal desecration of the corpse. The case is taken up by Dr. Laszlo Kreizler (Daniel Brühl, who played Zemo in Captain America: Civil War). He
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?

How often do the four SAG champs go on to win Oscars?
With their wins at Sunday’s Screen Actors Guild Awards, Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”) and Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) continue their march toward becoming the first foursome to sweep the Golden Globe, Critics’ Choice, SAG, BAFTA and Oscar. Their SAG victories are the most important ones of the three groups so far, as the SAGs have a fantastic correlation with the Oscars; SAG has only missed five times in Best Actor, six times in Best Actress, nine times in Best Supporting Actor and seven times in Best Supporting Actress. But despite so much overlap between the individual races, SAG does not go 4-for-4 with Oscar in one season as often as you might think.

Over its 23-year history, SAG has only had a direct match in all four Oscar acting races six times, most recently three years ago. SAG typically goes 3-for-4 with Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind’
In “Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind,” a documentary that’s sharp-edged, humane, and deeply researched enough to take you closer to the manic engine of Williams’ brilliance and pain than you were before, the smartest decision made by the director, Marina Zenovich, was to use a great many never-before-seen outtakes, as well as clips from obscure or forgotten performances, so that Williams’ routines hit the audience with a fresh ping. In one of the most spectacular of these clips, the film replays the extended acceptance speech he made for Best Actor at the 2003 Critics’ Choice awards.

Williams didn’t actually win the award. He was up for his turn as a creepy psycho nerd in “One Hour Photo” (to me, a rather overrated stunt of a performance), and he lost. There was, in fact, a tie that year, with the award going to both the other nominees: Daniel Day-Lewis for “Gangs of New York” and Jack Nicholson
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Things to Know About This Year’s BAFTA Nominations

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts unveiled the nominations for its film awards Tuesday. The BAFTAs are the most glittering film awards outside the U.S. and are often seen as an Oscar bellwether.

Here are 10 things to know about the new crop of nominees:

1.) For the fifth year in a row, not a single woman has been nominated in the best director category. The last female director to be nominated was Kathryn Bigelow, in 2013, for “Zero Dark Thirty.”

2.) Eight actors have received their first-ever BAFTA nominations: Timothée Chalamet (“Call Me by Your Name”), Willem Dafoe (“The Florida Project”), Woody Harrelson (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”), Daniel Kaluuya (“Get Out”), Laurie Metcalf (“Lady Bird”), Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”), and Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”). In addition, Kaluuya and Chalamet are up against each other in two different categories: for leading actor and for BAFTA’s Rising Star award, the only
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gangs of New York: Reality vs. Fiction

The film by Martin Scorcese, Gangs of New York, features a lot of historical accuracy but also created a lot of buzz among historians by painting a few inaccurate pictures within the movie as well. These were of course done on purpose by Scorsese since he wasn’t interested in shooting a documentary, but instead an entertaining film that would draw people in and perhaps even make them question what really happened. The funny thing about this is that historians can say whatever they want based on the evidence they find. The truth however is that no one would really know

Gangs of New York: Reality vs. Fiction
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Daniel Day-Lewis Made A Balenciaga Dress From Scratch To Prepare For ‘Phantom Thread’

Daniel Day-Lewis Made A Balenciaga Dress From Scratch To Prepare For ‘Phantom Thread’
Daniel Day-Lewis, with three Oscars already in the bag, retired from acting this past year, with his final role being another brilliant performance in Paul Thomas Anderson‘s “Phantom Thread.” The ultimate method actor, Day-Lewis is known for taking extreme measures to perfect a given role. He apprenticed with an actual butcher for his role as Bill “The Butcher” in “Gangs of New York“; he was fully in character, both on and off-screen, as Abraham Lincoln in “Lincoln“; he learned to build canoes, lived with Native Americans, learned to track and skin animals for his role in “The Last Of The Mohicans“; he refused to use his hands, only using his feet to complete daily tasks, for his role as cerebral palsy-inflicted, celebrated painter Christie Brown in “My Left Foot“; he learned to speak Czech for “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” oh, and lest we forget, he spent nights in jail,
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The Cinematic 12 Days of Christmas

Matt Rodgers on the Cinematic 12 Days of Christmas…

Tis the season, you know the one, no matter your own belief system you’re going to be exposed to seasonal songs being pumped into your every waking hour by supermarkets, cinemas, and family members.

Here at Flickering Myth we’re not going to be a pre-ghosted Ebenezer Scrooge, we’re going to embrace the festivities like a skipping, dancing, Muppet carrying Michael Caine, by skewing one of the most beloved Christmas songs into a cinema themed run down. Ladies and gentlemen, here are the 12 Days of Christmas, movie style.

12 Drummers Drumming

There’s only one obvious place to go for the first selection of our Christmas congregation, and it’s not the Nick Cannon percussion classic Drumline. Instead we’ve opted for the Damien Chazelle film that should have won all the Oscars; Whiplash.

Memorable for the one it did pick
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'Gangs of New York': THR's 2002 Review

'Gangs of New York': THR's 2002 Review
On Dec. 20, 2002, Martin Scorsese unveiled a new crime epic, Gangs of New York, in theaters. The film went on to be nominated for 10 honors at the 75th Academy Awards but left without a single win. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below: 

Martin Scorsese's careerlong exploration of the role of violence in American society culminates in Gangs of New York. The view here is that brutality and corruption played midwives to the American nation, that the American dream of liberty from European despotism, monarchy and aristocratic privilege ran afoul of the New World vices of bigotry and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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