7.5/10
17
1 user 2 critic

El día que me quieras (1997)

A non-narrative film investigating death and the power of photography, El Día Que Me Quieras is a meditation on the last pictures taken of Ernesto Che Guevara, as he lay dead on a table ... See full summary »

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Freddy Alborta ...
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A non-narrative film investigating death and the power of photography, El Día Que Me Quieras is a meditation on the last pictures taken of Ernesto Che Guevara, as he lay dead on a table surrounded by his captors, in Bolivia in 1967. Not a political documentary in the traditional sense, the film alternates between evocation and straight reportage, centering on an interview with the Bolivian photographer Freddy Alborta. Suffused with a sense of mystery, El Día Que Me Quieras is about our assimilation of history. Written by Leandro Katz

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Documentary | Short

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9 May 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Day You Love Me  »

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Interesting, but perhaps too little material for a 30 minute film
23 May 2007 | by (New York, USA) – See all my reviews

"El dia que me quieras" looks at the iconic photograph of the executed revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara, taken by Bolivian photographer Freddy Alborta. The film includes interviews with Alborta, intercut with some arresting and sometimes surreal scenes from a Bolivian village festival.

"El dia" is an interesting meditation on the photograph and the circumstances under which it was taken, but the material may be too slight to justify a thirty-minute documentary. The scenes shot in the village, while undeniably beautiful, feel like padding.

The film doesn't offer any major revelations to students of either Guevara or photography, but it's an interesting and attractive piece nonetheless. It's just a pity that the director didn't have slightly more to show for his thirty minutes.


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