Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Christine Hargreaves ...
Pauline
...
Sullivan
Peter Kerrigan ...
Peter
Paula McDonagh ...
Paula
Gary Todd ...
Gary
Grace Allen ...
Grace
Dawn Booth ...
Baby Dawn
Angela Catherall ...
Jackie
Gertie Almond ...
Gertie
Elaine Lindsay ...
Mrs. Johnson
Bernard Atha ...
Councillor Conway
...
Director of Social Services
...
Deputy Director of Social Services
Donald Gee ...
Dr. Whitehead
Frances Cox ...
Supervisor at Home
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 January 1978 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Bernard Atha, who plays Councilor Conway, was at the time of filming a Leeds City Councilor. He was later Lord Mayor of Leeds. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Television at its angriest
19 September 2000 | by (London) – See all my reviews

The late Jim Allen was not known for his restraint and The Spongers is perhaps his fiercest and most devastating attack on modern life. It centres on Pauline, whose husband has recently left her with huge debts which she is not entitled to assistance with from the state. She is trying to bring up four children, one of which has Down's Syndrome. Matters reach a critical stage when that child is moved into an old people's home as a result of council cutbacks. The real target of this play may appear to be the uncaring beauracracy who turn their backs on a woman trying desperately to raise her children against all odds, but in fact Allen is really attacking the public attitude that all people on state benefits are parasites. It is an unashamedly biased portrait, as Pauline (Christine Hargreaves) is depicted without any black side to her character, while the council representatives are all unattractive, unsympathetic cipers. Such is the tactic that dates back to the earliest of Ken Loach's works. The Spongers is in a way a celebration of all that was good about the filmed television play in the 1970s, with a huge cast, unflinchingly bleak and fiercely political. From the opening shots of an upside down Queen with the telling title underneath, this is a play prepared to say exactly what it wants. The ending is horrific, the acting is stunningly naturalistic. Where has television like this gone?


18 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?