Maude Brooks is in love with an aviator, George Pinckney. Maude tells her father that she intends to marry George, as he is a splendid fellow, but her father will not listen to her. So she ... See full summary »

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Earle Williams ...
George Pinckney
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Maud Brooks
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Mr. Brooks - Maud's Father
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Storyline

Maude Brooks is in love with an aviator, George Pinckney. Maude tells her father that she intends to marry George, as he is a splendid fellow, but her father will not listen to her. So she decides to elope. Maude meets George at the machine and together they fly up into the air. Mr. Brooks, who has been apprised of his daughter's intentions, starts in pursuit. He also flies in an aeroplane until something goes wrong. Then he has to descend and by devious routes manages to reach the express train, which runs to the neighboring town, where his daughter has fled to be married. An exciting race takes place between the flying machine and the locomotive. When the train reaches the station, Mr. Brooks hails an automobile and arrives at the church just as his daughter has changed her name to Mrs. George Pinckney. He is furious, but Maude's persuasiveness leads him to see things in a different light. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short

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11 November 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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There are a few effectively dramatic incidents
21 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An elopement by aeroplane is itself a novel enough feature to be interesting. This picture, however, in order to bring in the flying machine again and again, has sacrificed very nearly all its dramatic interest. There are a few effectively dramatic incidents, as, for instance, when the girl, whose father disliked aviator sons-in-law, is seen walking over country meadows. She looks up and sees her lover flying among the clouds; but we don't see him. She waves, and he throws her a message asking her to meet him at the hangar and proposing a scheme to get ahead of papa. Later, we see the two start off on their flying elopement. Papa attempts to follow in another aeroplane, but it breaks down. Then he gets an automobile, then takes a train, then continues in a fast motor boat. This chase isn't dramatic at all, because it isn't at all convincing. An aeroplane can go anywhere, at least in a story, and the only dramatic way of following would have been another aeroplane. The film has some very interesting scenes. - The Moving Picture World, November 25, 1911


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