5.5/10
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I Zombie: The Chronicles of Pain (1998)

A young man gets infected and gradually starts turning into a zombie.

Director:

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1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Giles Aspen ...
Mark
Ellen Softley ...
Sarah
Dean Sipling ...
David
Claire Griffin ...
Sarah's Friend
Peter Hacket ...
Hitcher
Kate Thorougood ...
Prostitute
Mia Fothergill ...
Estate Agent
Nick Mallinowski ...
Police Man
Nana Takahashi ...
Girl on Phone
Paul Hyett ...
Tramp
Stuart Oldfield ...
Victim 1
Phil Rowe ...
Victim 2
Andy Collins ...
Victim 3
Jane Smith ...
Zombie Girl
Jon Lovell ...
Dream Zombie
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Storyline

A young man, while out on a field trip, gets bitten by an ill looking person. When he comes back home he starts getting sick and a slow but steady degeneration begins in his body. He is turning into a zombie. He leaves his girlfriend and moves into his own place. In order to survive he needs to eat human flesh. Against his own consciense, he kills people and eats them in his living room. But things start getting worse as his degeneration progresses. Written by Semih Tareen

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

His soul was the last to go.

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

18 February 2014 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

I, Zombie: The Chronicles of Pain  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Connections

Referenced in Birth of the Living Dead (2013) See more »

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User Reviews

The ultimate existentialist zombie movie
14 April 2003 | by (Lisbon) – See all my reviews

Andrew Parkinson's debut feature is a brave try at making the ultimate existentialist zombie movie, following a graduate student (Giles Aspen) infected by the zombie disease during a country walk and his progressive yielding to the hunger for human flesh. Intercutting "present-day" TV-style interviews with his girlfriend and the friends he lost touch with after his disappearance with his own experiences as he progressively succumbs to the primary urge to survive, there's much to admire in the straight-faced approach to the premise and in the bold clinical way in which Parkinson documents the gradual loss of Mark's humanity. Not surprisingly, the amateurish home-movie visuals (the film was actually shot in 16mm over a two-year period) lend some power to the conceit; the basic problem with "I Zombie" is that the script is insufficiently developed for a feature and should have stayed just under the hour-long mark. Alternatively you may try and see it as a laugh, but you'll be surprised just how quickly the laughs die down under the film's dark spell.


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